race

Paige Pfleger / WOSU

This is part two of a two-part series about race inside Columbus Division of Police. Read part one here

Editor’s Note: This story has been updated to include comments from Columbus Public Safety Director Ned Pettus, who oversees the Columbus Division of Police. He was interviewed prior to publication, but his comments were erroneously not included in the original story.

This illustration shows four white men on the banks of a river or creek, an empty horse-drawn wagon visible behind them. A wooden rowboat carrying two African American men
L.J. Bridgman / Ohio History Connection

Before the Civil War, thousands of people escaped slavery by traveling north through Ohio on the Underground Railroad, a loose system of safe "stations" where abolitionists and humanitarians gave aide and shelter to formerly enslaved people.

Updated at 5:30 p.m. ET

Former Vice President Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, on Tuesday detailed a proposal to advance racial equity in the United States.

The plan is the fourth and final pillar of his "Build Back Better" agenda for economic recovery, crafted in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

Updated 5:05 p.m. ET, July 23

The White House is repealing and replacing an Obama-era rule intended to combat historic racial discrimination in housing.

In a Wednesday announcement, the White House said it would be rolling back the rule as a part of a broader deregulation push.

Last month, Cleveland’s elected officials and nonprofit leaders took to the steps of City Hall to hail a declaration by city council that racism is a public health crisis.

This spring, as it became clear COVID-19 was hitting African-Americans especially hard, Indianapolis-area health officials vowed to set up testing sites in “hotspot” neighborhoods. One opened in predominantly Black Arlington Woods, at a respected local institution: Eastern Star Church.

dcJohn / Flickr

With protests shining a light on deeply rooted racial inequities, school leaders are being asked to be on the lookout for racial trauma when students return to class.

Ohio History Connection

The Ohio Constitution bans slavery except for one reason, and at least one Black lawmaker wants that exception stripped from the state’s governing document.

The killing of George Floyd has ignited protests and inspired conversations — and changes — across the globe.

New federal data reinforces the stark racial disparities that have appeared with COVID-19: According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Black Americans enrolled in Medicare were hospitalized with the disease at rates nearly four times higher than their white counterparts.

Republican Sen. Steve Huffman speaks during a rally at Darke County GOP headquarters in Greenville, Ohio in this October 13, 2014 file photo.
Al Behrman / AP

A Republican state senator from the Dayton area has lost his job as an emergency room doctor after asking a racially insensitive question at a hearing on a resolution to declare racism a public health crisis.

Ohio Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina)
Ohio Senate

As state lawmakers are asked to consider a resolution to declare racism a public health crisis, Ohio Senate leaders plan to hold meetings throughout the state to listen to the concerns of black Ohioans. 

A demonstration at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus drew thousands on Friday night, June 5, 2020.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

A resolution introduced to declare racism a public health crisis is getting its first hearing in the Republican-dominated Ohio Senate, where one member of the GOP has joined eight Democrats in sponsoring the measure.

As the country erupts in protests over police brutality and racism, two-thirds of Americans think President Trump has increased racial tensions in the U.S., according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll.

The poll offers a snapshot of a nation in upheaval after a video captured a Minneapolis police officer with his knee on the neck of a black man named George Floyd, who was pleading for his life before he died.

The man who filmed video of the fatal shooting of Ahmaud Arbery in February has been arrested, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation said Thursday. William "Roddie" Bryan Jr. is charged with felony murder and criminal attempt to commit false imprisonment.

Bryan, 50, recorded the video that ignited anger and protests in the Brunswick, Ga., area earlier this month. It shows Arbery, who is black, jogging down a residential street, two white men confronting him, and the ensuing struggle.

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