race | WOSU Radio

race

The Code Switch Guide To Halloween

Oct 28, 2019

It's that time of year: Leaves are falling, temperatures are dropping, families are heading out to the pumpkin patch and that one neighbor is preparing to hand out raisins to kids who'd much, much rather have candy. All is well — at least until our social media feeds are flooded with the annual onslaught of racial Halloween faux pas.

A transmasculine person with a natural hairstyle.
Zackary Drucker / The Gender Spectrum Collection

Cincinnati City Council voted Wednesday to make it illegal to discriminate against natural hair and hairstyles associated with race.

The Russian government's interference in the 2016 U.S. elections singled out African Americans, a new Senate committee report concludes.

Using Facebook pages, Instagram content and Twitter posts, Russian information operatives working for the Internet Research Agency had an "overwhelming operational emphasis on race ... no single group of Americans was targeted ... more than African Americans."

A customer at Ms. Melanin in Canal Winchester looks at a weave. Ms. Melanin is one of seven black-owned beauty supply stores in the state.
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

A city council member in Cincinnati wants to prohibit discrimination against natural hair and natural hairstyles associated with race.

Updated at 6:45 p.m. ET

A judge has ruled in favor of Harvard University in a high-profile court case centered on whether the school's admissions process forces Asian Americans to clear a higher bar to get in.

Jeromy Brown, a 46-year-old teacher in Iowa, considers President Trump a white supremacist.

"If the shoe fits, then say it, and the shoe fits him," Brown said, while waiting in a photo line at an Elizabeth Warren rally in August. "Why should he be excused from that label?"

Courtesy of Communications Workers of America

Workers and activists delivered a petition Thursday to a Verizon Wireless store in Lancaster to reinstate an employee who was fired. 

Ohio State professor Frederick Aldama, co-creator and director of SOL-CON.
Debbie Holmes / WOSU

The growing racial diversity of Columbus inspired an Ohio State University English professor to create an exposition for black and brown comic artists and animators. Now in its fifth year, “SÕL-CON: The Brown and Black Comix Expo” brings together students, indie comics, exhibitors and industry insiders.

When the first enslaved Africans landed on American shores in 1619, their musical traditions landed with them. Four centuries later, the primacy of African American music is indisputable, not only in this country but in much of the world. How that music has evolved, blending with or giving rise to other traditions — from African songs and dances to field hollers and spirituals, from ragtime and blues to jazz, R&B and hip-hop — is a topic of endless discussion.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is apologizing for having worn brownface makeup at a 2001 costume party.

"I should have known better then, but I didn't and I did it and I'm deeply sorry," he said to reporters in his campaign plane in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Columbus Montessori Education Center

State investigation records show an Ohio agency could not find proof of alleged misconduct by administrators at Columbus Montessori Education Center.

Janelle Faison (left) and Megan Torres accuse Columbus Montessori of racial bias.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Two parents are calling for administrators to step down at their children’s former school, Columbus Montessori Education Center. They argue racial bias played a role in how they and their kids were treated.

Fortune 500 companies, craft breweries and eateries tend to dominate business coverage of Cincinnati. But Essence magazine says the Queen City is the fastest growing economic power in the Midwest—in particular, minority businesses are booming, especially if you're black, the magazine says.

Columbus Police disproportionately use force against black suspects, according to a department-wide review released by the city Wednesday. The study also found wide racial disparities in the public perception of police.

This Jan. 8, 2001. file photo shows the Ohio State Penitentiary (OSP) in Youngstown, Ohio, the state's highest security prison.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

An Ohio State University analysis of state, county and federal data suggests racial disparities in criminal sentencing have declined. 

Pages