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Columbus Montessori Education Center

State investigation records show an Ohio agency could not find proof of alleged misconduct by administrators at Columbus Montessori Education Center.

Janelle Faison (left) and Megan Torres accuse Columbus Montessori of racial bias.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Two parents are calling for administrators to step down at their children’s former school, Columbus Montessori Education Center. They argue racial bias played a role in how they and their kids were treated.

Fortune 500 companies, craft breweries and eateries tend to dominate business coverage of Cincinnati. But Essence magazine says the Queen City is the fastest growing economic power in the Midwest—in particular, minority businesses are booming, especially if you're black, the magazine says.

Columbus Police disproportionately use force against black suspects, according to a department-wide review released by the city Wednesday. The study also found wide racial disparities in the public perception of police.

This Jan. 8, 2001. file photo shows the Ohio State Penitentiary (OSP) in Youngstown, Ohio, the state's highest security prison.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

An Ohio State University analysis of state, county and federal data suggests racial disparities in criminal sentencing have declined. 

The goal of the National African American Gun Association is to introduce black Americans to guns and also instruct them on how to use them.

Some see the group as an alternative to the National Rifle Association for black gun owners, but it has some notable differences. Organizers say it is a civil rights organization that aims to build community and promote self-protection.

Since its creation in 2015, the group has seen rapid growth with roughly 30,000 members and 75 chapters nationwide. Leaders expect another 25 chapters by next year.

Before taking Ethnic Studies at Walnut Hills High School, Holly Bates wanted to talk about race but didn't feel comfortable because of what she thinks is a lack of knowledge.

Medicine continues to advance on many fronts, yet basic health care fails hundreds of women a year who die during or after pregnancy, especially women of color. Black mothers die at a rate that's 3.3 times greater than whites, and Native American or Alaskan Native women die at a rate 2.5 times greater than whites, according to a report out this week from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Nearly 100 years ago, Congress passed a restrictive law that cut the overall number of immigrants coming to the United States and put severe limits on those who were let in.

Journalist Daniel Okrent says that the eugenics movement — a junk science that stemmed from the belief that certain races and ethnicities were morally and genetically superior to others — informed the Immigration Act of 1924, which restricted entrance to the U.S.

White drug users addicted to heroin, fentanyl and other opioids have had near exclusive access to buprenorphine, a drug that curbs the craving for opioids and reduces the chance of a fatal overdose. That's according to a study out Wednesday from the University of Michigan.

Ohio State professor Elena Foulis (left) and Ohio State student Adriana Ponce De Leon (right) produce the podcast Ohio Habla.
Debbie Holmes / WOSU

A new podcast developed at Ohio State University highlights the rich history and experience of Latinos in Ohio.

Kae Petrin
St. Louis Public Radio

Brittany "Tru" Kellman sometimes starts her day two hours before Jamaa Birth Village opens at 10 a.m., stashing diapers and snacks for the dozens of people who will come through the Ferguson nonprofit’s doors. She gives everyone a hug when she meets them.

Seven years after Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in Major League Baseball, a 29-year-old utility player from Indiana named Chuck Harmon became the first African-American to play for the Cincinnati Reds.

Pollution, much like wealth, is not distributed equally in the United States.

Scientists and policymakers have long known that black and Hispanic Americans tend to live in neighborhoods with more pollution of all kinds, than white Americans. And because pollution exposure can cause a range of health problems, this inequity could be a driver of unequal health outcomes across the U.S.

As marijuana becomes legal around the country, blacks and Latinos are often left out of new business opportunities. Advocates say people of color are often reluctant to join the growing legal marijuana economy because they were targeted far more often than whites during the war on drugs. Studies show members of such communities were arrested and jailed for illegal marijuana use far more often than whites.

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