protest

Wednesday morning, at 10 o'clock, students at schools across the country will walk out of their classrooms. The plan is for them to leave school — or at least gather in the hallway — for 17 minutes. That's one minute for each of the victims in last month's school shooting in Parkland, Fla.

The walkout has galvanized teens nationwide and raised big questions for schools about how to handle protests.

For seven years, Ohio lawmakers have been cutting down on gun regulation. But while there are 22 gun-related bills pending in the legislature right now, lawmakers have recently pumped the brakes on passing the most controversial ones. Gov. John Kasich has recently turned around on gun control measures, proposing a package of six bills he calls “reasonable”. That has gun rights supporters voicing their frustration.

Lakewood High School Walkout / Twitter

The Ohio State University and more than a dozen other Ohio colleges and universities have vowed to defend the admissions of students who are disciplined for participating in peaceful protests.

It's too early to know if politicians will heed the calls for increased gun control after the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. But one thing is clear: If change comes, it will be because of the passionate activism of the schools' students.

Lakewood High School Walkout / Twitter

Students at several Northeast Ohio high schools staged walkouts Wednesday, a week after the deaths of 17 people at a Florida school.

Nick Evans / WOSU

Students at two Columbus-area schools held demonstrations in solidarity with Florida high-schoolers who are pushing for new gun laws.

A group of teenagers who say they are desperate for some action on gun control staged a silent "lie-in" outside the White House Monday, in the wake of the deadly Florida school shooting last week.

Columbus Unitarian Church Rev. Marian Stewart speaks during a press conference at the Ohio State House.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Activists for low-income Ohioans say they are stepping up lobbying and protesting for change. It is one of 30 campaigns being waged throughout the country.

Erin Clark / WOUB

Almost a year to date after the 2017 Women’s March, Central Ohio women are taking to the street once again. On Saturday, as part of a national day of protest, a “Power to the Polls” march will begin at the Greater Columbus Convention Center and end at the Statehouse.

On Sunday, people around the country will mark one year since the Women's March on Washington, D.C. Last year it brought hundreds of thousands of liberals to the capital, many wearing pink knitted caps in solidarity. Others marched in hundreds of cities and towns across the United States and more than 80 other countries.

Demonstrators marched outside a Verizon store in Kenwood Thursday. They were part of a national protest against Federal Communications Commission (FCC) plans to repeal net neutrality.

Before dawn, about 75 Teamsters and their supporters held candles to honor those who've died or are still struggling with addiction.
Mike Thompson / WOSU

The International Brotherhood of Teamsters continued its pressure on Dublin-based drug distributor Cardinal Health Wednesday morning with a vigil to call attention to Cardinal’s role in the opioid crisis.

Columbus Crew SC fans gathered outside Columbus City Hall on Sunday for the Save the Crew rally.
Kate Quickel

The steps outside Columbus City Hall turned into a sea of black and gold on Sunday as thousands of Crew SC fans turned out for a “Save the Crew” rally.

Updated 5 p.m. ET

NFL owners and players met at league headquarters in New York on Tuesday but put forward no policy changes regarding the controversial player protests during the national anthem.

NFL commissioner Roger Goodell told reporters Wednesday that the participants did not discuss the idea of team owners disciplining players for protesting, saying that it "wasn't necessary."

"Everyone should stand for the national anthem," Goodell said. "We all feel very strongly about our country and our pride, and we're going to continue to do that."

Updated Monday 8:20 a.m. ET

President Trump on Monday defended Vice President Mike Pence's decision to walk out of Sunday's NFL game between the Indianapolis Colts and the San Francisco 49ers in Indianapolis.

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