protest

Columbus Police officers maintain crowds around the Ohio Statehouse on May 30, 2020.
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

With protesters again demonstrating in downtown Columbus, City Council on Monday voted to declare racism a public health crisis. 

Updated at 9:31 p.m. ET

Escalating his rhetoric during a period of roiling national crises, President Trump on Monday threatened to deploy the U.S. military to cities or states that don't take "necessary" actions to halt violent protests, saying the armed forces will "quickly solve the problem for them."

Trump's Rose Garden remarks came as just across the street, law enforcement officers deployed tear gas and shot rubber bullets to forcefully disperse peaceful protesters. Washington, D.C., had set a curfew Monday of 7 p.m. ET.

Protesters on the sidewalk of the Ohio Statehouse face Columbus Police officers, who stood in the middle of High Street, on June 1, 2020.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

One week after the death of George Floyd, protestors in Columbus are calling for police reforms while urging demonstrators to remain nonviolent.

Angie Wang / Associated Press

Ohio State University's student government is calling on the university to break ties with Columbus Police.

Columbus Police blockade the intersection of Broad and High Streets in downtown Columbus on May 30, 2020.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Columbus Mayor Andrew Ginther has declared a state of emergency and signed an executive order extending the city's curfew indefinitely, in the wake of continued protests over the killing of George Floyd.

Ginther also announced the creation of a new email address to report potential misconduct by Columbus Police officers during protests.

Updated at 5:45 p.m. ET

President Trump on Monday called governors weak and urged them to "dominate" to prevent further violent demonstrations following the death of George Floyd, a black man in Minneapolis who died after a white police officer kneeled on his neck.

Attorney General William Barr is sending specialized teams of federal agents to help control protests in Washington, D.C., and Miami, and the FBI is setting up command posts in cities across the country as demonstrations against George Floyd's death move into a second week.

Willie Ramey cleans up from a night of protests on Gay Street in downtown Columbus on June 1, 2020.
Nick Evans / WOSU

As the sun crept over downtown Columbus on Monday morning, residents and workers again found themselves cleaning up after a day of protests.

Protests And Police

Jun 1, 2020
Crowds protesting the killing of George Floyd in downtown Columbus on Saturday, May 30, 2020.
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

Black leaders across the country called on city and police officials to address police brutality and systemic racism.

In Columbus, leaders urged police reforms, starting with an independent investigation into police use of force.

Weekly Reporter Roundtable

Jun 1, 2020
Crowds protesting the killing of George Floyd in downtown Columbus on Saturday, May 30, 2020.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Gov. Mike DeWine called out the National Guard Saturday after peaceful protests in downtown Columbus turned violent over the weekend.

A 10 p.m. curfew is in effect until further notice, and business owners began cleaning up broken windows and damage.

Updated 2:25 p.m. ET

Protesters staged large-scale demonstrations across the country on Sunday, expressing outrage at the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis and, more broadly, anger at police brutality. Some cities, including Minneapolis, Atlanta and Louisville, saw clashes with police, buildings and cars set afire, and looting.

Protesters took to the streets of Downtown Cincinnati for a third time on Sunday, all in honor of George Floyd, the African American Minneapolis man killed by a white police officer last week.

Columbus Police used tear gas to disperse protesters on May 31, soon after arriving downtown.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Hours ahead of the city's second night of curfew, Columbus Police deployed tear gas on protesters and blocked off streets downtown.

Updated at 7:27 p.m. ET

As overlapping crises convulse an anxious nation, President Trump on Sunday sought to cast blame for widespread protests gripping cities on "radical-left anarchists," while adding that the media "is doing everything within their power to foment hatred and anarchy."

Cincinnati is extending a weekend curfew implemented as protests continue with more planned Sunday and Monday. A citywide curfew will now begin at 9 p.m., running through at least Tuesday morning.

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