protest

Michael Lee / WOSU

With Columbus Pride weekend in full swing, a "big LGBTQ dance party" might seem like an ordinary sight. But the party that took over Gay Street on Friday had one specific guest in mind: Vice President Mike Pence.

Michael Conroy / Associated Press

Vice President Mike Pence is set to visit Columbus on Friday, June 15, to tout the new federal tax reform plan. He’ll be met outside the Columbus Renaissance hotel with what protesters are calling the “Big LGBTQ Dance Party.”

Stonewall Columbus is hosting its 37th year of the Columbus Pride Pride Festival and Parade in celebration of the LGBTQ community. Ahead of the festival's kick-off on Friday, Columbus Police are ramping up security measures.

The campaign is based around Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Clergy members and advocates for the poor from around the state converged at the Statehouse Monday for what’s being called a “die in."

Activists for the Poor Peoples Campaign protested at the Ohio Statehouse on Tuesday, May 29, 2018.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Advocates for low-income Ohioans continue what they are calling the “Poor People’s Protest.” And this latest one at the Statehouse culminated with some activists being removed from the premises without a struggle.

The 40-day Poor People's campaign will feature numerous events centered around non-violent activism.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Fifty years ago, Martin Luther King Jr. advocated for Americans living in poverty in what was called the “Poor People’s Campaign.” But advocates for poor Ohioans say the problems that existed are still common. So, they’re relaunching the effort that was first kicked off a half a century ago.

Nick Evans / WOSU

More than 200 students left class at 10 a.m. on Friday and marched around the track at Upper Arlington HighSschool, as part of a national walkout demanding gun policy changes. 

Andy Chow / Statehouse News Bureau

One day after students at Central Ohio schools walked out of class again to call for tighter gun laws, pro-gun activists will rally themselves in downtown Columbus.

At schools across the country today, students are getting up from their desks and walking out when the clock strikes 10 a.m. They're participating in the National School Walkout, part of the movement that has taken hold among students to call for action to end gun violence.

Today marks 19 years since the shooting at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo., in which two high school students shot and killed thirteen people.

Ohio students are once again preparing to walk out of their classrooms in support of stricter gun laws.

Many of the Friday walkouts, protests and marches will mark the 19th anniversary of the Columbine school shooting, where 13 people were killed. At the time, it was the deadliest school shooting in U.S. history.

Nick Evans, WOSU News

Students at about a dozen Central Ohio schools plan to stage another walkout on Friday morning, calling for gun reform and commemorating the 19th anniversary of the Columbine shooting.

When Lane Murdock, a high school sophomore, heard that 17 high school students and educators had been killed in a shooting in Parkland, Fla., she says she felt numb.

To her, and so many others, mass shootings can feel all too common in the U.S.

"In the time I've been in high school we've had the Pulse, Las Vegas and now, [the Parkland] shooting," Murdock says.

Whetstone High School Wednesday morning while an anti-abortion walkout was slated to happen.
Nick Evans

Wednesday's "Pro-Life Walkout" was supposed to be the anti-abortion answer to last month's "March For Our Lives." Rather than calling for gun regulations, though, abortion opponents touted a nationwide walkout at 200 schools to protest a procedure they equate with murder.

Allegra Boverman

Ohio's Republican Gov. John Kasich is urging the thousands of gun control supporters who marched in Columbus, Washington and several other cities last weekend to “keep it up.”

Kasich made his comments Sunday on CNN’s "State of the Union," where he said those who want to toughen gun restrictions can see incremental change if they keep pressure on lawmakers.

More than 50 Lakewood High School students joined hundreds of thousands of their peers in chants of "enough is enough” and “vote them out” Saturday during a march in Washington, D.C.

Titled the “March For Our Lives” by its organizers, the National Park Service issued a permit for 500,000 participants on Pennsylvania Avenue, but before the noontime event, security entrances were closed with the Lakewood students still on the outside.

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