protest

Columbus State Community College

Columbus State Community College announced Tuesday that it will "dismantle and store" a statue of Christopher Columbus on its downtown campus.

After almost three weeks of demonstrations following the death of George Floyd while in Minneapolis police custody, America seems to be at a threshold moment.

Polling shows attitudes shifting more in favor of protesters and embracing the potential for change when it comes to how policing is done in this country.

Police departments in at least half a dozen states have already moved to make reforms, but when it comes to sweeping national change, it's not clear how far Washington will go.

As demonstrators gathered around the White House last weekend, Howard University law student Tope Aladetimi leaned her cardboard protest sign against the street median and took a load off her feet. She had already been out protesting for a few hours, and the temperature was climbing into the 90s.

"There's a power in using your body, and actually physically being here," Aladetimi said. "Oftentimes, our voices aren't heard and this is the only way we're able to get our message across."

Domonique Dille, a Howard law school classmate, feels an urgency to this moment.

Adrienne Hood is the mother of Henry Green, who was killed by plainclothes Columbus Police officers about four years ago.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Hundreds of people in red shirts gathered at Columbus City Hall on Friday for a march to the Statehouse in honor of families who have lost loved ones during police encounters. 

Columbus Police used tear gas to disperse protesters on May 31, soon after arriving downtown.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Exercise restraint. Use only the minimum amount of lawful force. Do not show anger.

Every officer in training in Ohio is taught crowd control policies, outlined in a document that Columbus Police Chief Tom Quinlan helped write. Following recent demonstrations over police violence, however, protesters question if Quinlan’s officers followed those guidelines.

More than 20 Ohio state legislators are calling for an end to the use of tear gas and other chemical agents to disperse crowds at protests in the state.

The group of Democratic lawmakers signed a letter to the governor saying tear gas and other chemical agents can cause dangerous health effects such as respiratory failure, blindness and miscarriages.

They also said they’re concerned it could exacerbate the spread of the coronavirus.

Police in riot gear in front of a protest at the Ohio Statehouse.
Jo Ingles / Statehouse News Bureau

Columbus City Council hosted a hearing Wednesday afternoon to review how police are implementing recommended reforms from the city's Community Safety Advisory Commission.

Protesting during a pandemic likely leaves participants with at least two questions: Did I get infected? And might I be putting others at risk?

Given that COVID-19 has an incubation time of up to two weeks, experts say it will take a couple of weeks before the impact of the protests on community transmission is known. But in the meantime, there are critical steps you can take to minimize the risks to yourself and those you live with.

With Congress exploring legislation that would reshape what policing should look like in America following the death of George Floyd, the head of the nation's largest law enforcement union says he agrees with the growing consensus over the need for reform.

As nationwide protests against police brutality and racism demand change to current laws and institutions, the ripple effects are reaching historic symbols of white supremacy.

The effort to dismantle, relocate or rename symbols is happening in the sports world as well.

Athletes have gotten involved in a potential name change at the University of Cincinnati.

Columbus Police confront protesters at a demonstration downtown on June 2, 2020.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Columbus is planning to dismiss all charges against those arrested for breaking curfew during the last few weeks' protests.

U.S. Attorney General William Barr has repeatedly blamed anti-fascist activists for the violence that has erupted during demonstrations over George Floyd's death, but federal court records show no sign of so-called antifa links so far in cases brought by the Justice Department.

NPR has reviewed court documents of 51 individuals facing federal charges in connection with the unrest. As of Tuesday morning, none is alleged to have links to the antifa movement.

As demonstrations continue in honor of George Floyd, and many cities in Ohio and elsewhere have come under fire for police response to such protests, Gov. Mike DeWine on Tuesday announced he is asking Ohio's Collaborative Community Police Advisory Board to develop minimum standards on law enforcement response to mass protests.

Updated at 8:26 p.m. ET

Greg Glassman, the outspoken founder and CEO of CrossFit, resigned Tuesday, days after he made inflammatory remarks about the nationwide protests in support of Black Lives Matter. Athletes, gyms, Reebok and other athletic companies have been distancing themselves from the CrossFit brand over the controversy.

People arrested by Cincinnati Police for violating the city's recent curfew will not have the charges against them dismissed. But they could soon have options to avoid prosecution.

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