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protest

Janitorial workers rally in downtown Columbus on Sept. 16, 2019 to call for a higher minimum wage.
Paige Pfleger

Janitorial workers gathered in downtown Columbus on Monday afternoon to rally for a $15 minimum wage. 

For months, Hong Kong's streets have seethed with discontent. Scenes from the semiautonomous region show protesters, sometimes numbering in the hundreds of thousands, many wearing surgical masks and carrying umbrellas that have come to signify resistance.

The images are astonishing, and the issues that set the protests in motion are complex.

So here's a primer breaking down the major players, why they have poured into the streets and the response so far from China.

When hundreds of thousands filled Hong Kong's streets on June 9 to protest a controversial extradition bill, the only mainland coverage came from China Daily, an English-language state newspaper geared towards overseas audiences.

It falsely labelled the march as one in support of the bill, which would allow extradition of some criminal defendants in Hong Kong to face trial in China. The state broadcaster, CCTV, kept its coverage to a minimum. China's government was silent.

Updated at 12:02 p.m. ET

Hong Kong police cracked down on pro-democracy protesters demonstrating Tuesday at Hong Kong International Airport after they caused serious flight disruptions for a second day at one of the world's busiest aviation hubs.

Television footage showed tense confrontations late Tuesday between protesters wearing masks and local police. Protesters appeared to be barricading themselves inside a terminal using luggage carts as police tried to get them to leave.

Tensions were high at the site of the Oregon District shooting Wednesday morning, where a crowd of about 150 people waited for President Donald Trump’s arrival in Dayton.

Screaming matches broke out just steps away from flowers memorializing the nine people who were killed by a lone gunman Sunday.

Police, occupied by the president’s visit to a nearby hospital, were initially not at the scene.

Before officers arrived to calm the melee, City Commissioner Chris Shaw tried to de-escalate the conflict on his own by standing between the two groups.

Wednesday's Democratic presidential primary debate in Detroit was interrupted twice by protesters in the audience who were trying to draw attention to immigration and policing issues.

The first happened only minutes into the debate, which was broadcast live on CNN. During New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker's opening statement, a few audience members began yelling, "Fire Pantaleo."

Kroger says it will support and encourage farming practices that protect pollinators, like bees. One environmental activist group says that's a good start, but they want more specifics.

United States Sen. Sherrod Brown is requesting federal funds to help Dayton recover some of the city's costs associated with security for the May 25 Klan rally. In a letter to the U.S. Department of Justice, Brown wrote the city spent more than $650,000 to ensure the safety and security of people and property during, "the potentially volatile event.”

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley says that while the city did not ask Brown to make the request, she's thankful for the help.

A rally by an Indiana Ku Klux Klan group in Dayton’s Courthouse Square resulted in no major problems or violence Saturday. The event drew hundreds of police officers from across the Miami Valley and the state of Ohio, and crowds of counterdemonstrators, who flooded downtown Dayton to protest the KKK.

The protestors vastly outnumbered the nine Klan members who had traveled more than 100 miles from Indiana to rally inside a fenced-off plaza in Dayton’s Courthouse Square.

Note: this is a developing story. Please check back to this page for updates.

Saturday, 3:30pm: Members of the so-called Honorable Sacred Knights of Indiana have vacated Courthouse Square. Protestors are dispersing from both Main and Third Streets. 

In this Saturday, April 23, 2016 photo, members of the Ku Klux Klan participate in a "white pride" rally in Rome, Ga.
John Bazemore / Associated Press

Dayton activists have organized a number of events this Saturday for residents planning to stay away from Courthouse Square during a planned rally by an Indiana-based KKK group. 

Abortion-rights advocates are holding rallies across the country Tuesday, protesting a wave of laws passed by states in recent weeks to severely restrict access to abortions.

Organizers include the ACLU, Planned Parenthood Action Fund, and NARAL Pro-Choice America. More than 400 events were planned for a national day of action outside statehouses and courts, united under the #StopTheBans moniker.

In this Saturday, April 23, 2016 photo, members of the Ku Klux Klan participate in a "white pride" rally in Rome, Ga.
John Bazemore / Associated Press

Ahead of Saturday’s rally by an Indiana-based Ku Klux Klan group, Dayton officials are urging downtown residents, business owners and transit riders to prepare for disruptions.

Dayton police and community officials are urging anyone planning to counterprotest this month’s rally by an Indiana-based Ku Klux Klan group to take safety precautions.

More than three dozen residents met Tuesday night at the westside Boys and Girls Club of Dayton to hear about the city’s preparations and share their concerns about the upcoming so-called Honorable Sacred Knights’ rally.

Police Chief Richard Biehl told participants the department has, “done their homework and checked with other cities,” as they map out security plans for the May 25 Courthouse Square event.

Columbus Education Association president John Coneglio marches with hundreds of teachers in downtown Columbus on April 24, 2019.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Hundreds of teachers and their supporters streamed through downtown Columbus on Wednesday demanding lower class sizes, higher pay and an end to tax incentives for local developers.

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