protest

Law enforcement erected barriers at the Ohio Statehouse ahead of potentially armed protests on Sunday.
Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

The city of Columbus announced that it will close City Hall and surrounding buildings Tuesday and Wednesday to promote safety around President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration. They will already be closed Monday, January 18 in observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

Civil liberties advocates are warning that the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol could lead to new police and surveillance powers. If history is a guide, they say, those tools could be used against Blacks and other people of color in the justice system, not the white rioters who stormed Congress.

Supporters of President Donald Trump gathered in front of the Ohio Statehouse on January 6 shortly before the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Gov. Mike DeWine announced Thursday that the Ohio Statehouse and state office buildings downtown will be closed from Sunday-Wednesday to prepare for armed protests ahead of President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration.

About 75 people wearing masks and carrying signs protest outside the Ohio Statehouse on Thursday, April 9, 2020, in Columbus, Ohio.
Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

The Republican representative who proposed Ohio's "Stand Your Ground" law says he’s concerned about an armed march planned for the Statehouse this weekend.

Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) is activating 580 members of the Ohio National Guard to be ready for potential violent protests leading up to inauguration. Reports say armed supporters of President Donald Trump are planning for more protests in Washington, D.C. and even Ohio.

Supporters of President Donald Trump gathered in front of the Ohio Statehouse on January 6 shortly before the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

State officials are not saying much about preparations for an “armed march” planned for the Ohio Statehouse and other state capitols this Sunday.

When a pro-Trump mob attacked the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, surprisingly few police stood in the way. Protests had been expected for days, but police appeared unprepared for an actual insurrection and not even prepared to keep all the doors locked. Video showed police calmly talking with attackers after they moved into the building.

World leaders are condemning pro-Trump extremists' storming of the U.S. Capitol in a futile bid to stop members of Congress from certifying the Electoral College ballots for President-elect Joe Biden. The spectacle transfixed people around the globe.

Updated at 7:20 p.m. ET

After a mob of his supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol, President Trump downplayed the violence of the day and repeated his fraudulent claim that the election was stolen, but he also urged them to "go home."

In a Wednesday evening tweet, Trump wrote: "These are the things and events that happen when a sacred landslide election victory is so unceremoniously & viciously stripped away from great patriots who have been badly & unfairly treated for so long."

Updated at 4:22 p.m. ET

President-elect Joe Biden called the violent protests that engulfed the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday an "assault on the most sacred of American undertakings: the doing of the people's business" and called on President Trump to immediately demand that his supporters stop the violence.

In a somber address, Biden called on Trump, who had not publicly spoken since a rally earlier Wednesday, to "go on national television now to fulfill his oath and defend the Constitution and demand an end to this siege."

As pro-Trump extremists clash with police and breach the U.S. Capitol, Washington, D.C., Mayor Muriel Bowser has ordered a citywide curfew starting at 6 p.m. Wednesday.

"During the hours of the curfew, no person, other than persons designated by the Mayor, shall walk, bike, run, loiter, stand, or motor by car or other mode of transport upon any street, alley, park, or other public place within the District," her statement reads.

The curfew will last until 6 a.m. on Thursday.

It does not apply to essential workers, including media with outlet-issued credentials.

Updated at 11:45 p.m. ET

Congress reconvened Wednesday night to certify President-elect Joe Biden's Electoral College victory, just hours after the U.S. Capitol was thrust into chaos by supporters of President Trump — an angry mob that breached the complex in an unprecedented violent act at the seat of America's federal government.

Updated 3:08 p.m. ET

Thousands of Trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, prompting the House and Senate to abruptly take a recess as the U.S. Capitol Police locked down the building. D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser ordered a citywide curfew from 6 p.m. on Wednesday until 6 a.m. on Thursday.

Updated 5:08 p.m. ET

Kyle Rittenhouse, a young gunman facing criminal charges in the killing of two men and the serious injury of a third this summer in Kenosha, Wis., entered not guilty pleas to all charges during an arraignment Tuesday.

The Black Lives Matter movement became an international phenomenon in 2020. As protesters took to the streets in cities across the U.S. in the aftermath of the police killing of George Floyd, a Black man in Minneapolis, Minn., so did demonstrators in other countries — all with a similar message: Black lives matter.

"There is a George Floyd in every country," South Africa-based journalist Lynsey Chutel tells NPR's David Greene during a recent roundtable interview.

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