protest | WOSU Radio

protest

Updated at 4:15 p.m. ET

Roughly five months since massive protests first spread through Hong Kong, unrest has flared anew after a student died of injuries sustained during a protest. Chow Tsz-lok, a 22-year-old student at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, died Friday of brain injuries he suffered in a fall as police dispersed protesters from a parking garage earlier this week.

Chow is believed to be the first person to die in violence directly related to the protests.

Protesting Infrastructure

Nov 4, 2019

State lawmakers across the country are mulling model legislation intended to discourage protests at so-called critical infrastructure projects such as oil and gas pipelines. 

Supporters say the idea is to protect property and safety. Opponents say the idea is to stifle free speech. 

Today on All Sides with Ann Fisher: the right to protest at critical infrastructure projects. 

 

 

Guests:

Updated at 2:55 a.m. ET Saturday

Facing public backlash over penalizing a gamer for his statements in support of Hong Kong protesters, Blizzard Entertainment released a statement late Friday announcing a reduction of his penalties.

Blizzard Entertainment initially banned professional esports player Blitzchung from competitions for 12 months and rescinded his 2019 winnings, said to be $10,000, over his statements in support for Hong Kong's pro-democracy protests.

Oberlin College announced Tuesday it is appealing a judgment of $31 million in damages awarded to Gibson’s Bakery earlier this year.

The appeal is “grounded in the board’s fiduciary responsibility to the College’s long-term financial health,” said the chairman of the school’s board of trustees, Chris Canavan, in a press release.

In the appeal, Oberlin claims students were exercising their First Amendment rights and the college worked to make sure protests were peaceful. 

A rally in support of flavored vapor products was held at the Ohio Statehouse on Tuesday, October 1, 2019.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the state's efforts to regulate the vaping industry after a string of vaping-related injuries and deaths. James Jarvis, president of the Ohio Vapor Trade Association, joins the show. 

Hong Kong is bracing for more rallies and unrest this weekend as two important anniversaries loom, sparking fears that anti-government protests might once again boil over into violence on the streets.

Saturday marks five years since the start of the pro-democracy Umbrella Movement that unsuccessfully sought free and open elections in Hong Kong, a former British colony that reverted to Chinese control in 1997.

"Al Gore was right."

"There is no Planet B."

"Climate inaction is genocide."

"We stand for all people and all nations."

Dozens of University of Dayton students took part in today’s Global Climate Strike, joining thousands of other young people around the world.

Students gathered at UD’s Kennedy Union Fountain this afternoon to promote environmental sustainability and urge politicians to take action against climate change.

Senior Anthony Lapham was one of several students waiting in line to sign a sustainability pledge at the event.

Hundreds of students skipped class to rally at the Ohio Statehouse for action against climate change as part of the worldwide Climate Strike protest. 

History Of Protest In The U.S.

Sep 20, 2019
Mark Franko, 28-year General Motors employee, holds an American flag as employees gather outside the plant, Wednesday, March 6, 2019, in Lordstown, Ohio.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

From Women’s Suffrage at the turn of the century to the 2016 Women’s Carch, from the bonus army World War I vets marching in the 1930s to the Vietnam protests of the 60s, protest is woven into the changing culture of the U.S.

While the tactics may have changed since the Boston Tea Party, the exercise of the first amendment right to assembly has remained strong in our country’s 200+ year history.

Today on All Sides Weekend, we’ll discuss the evolution of protest, how it’s changed, and the role it plays in our history.

Guest:

Spurred by what they see as a sluggish, ineffectual response to the existential threat of global warming, student activists from around the world are skipping school Friday, for what organizers call a Global Climate Strike.

The young activists are protesting as the U.N. prepares to hold its Climate Action Summit on Monday in New York City.

A group of protesters marched in downtown Columbus to voice their support for more gun regulations, especially expanded background checks and the so-called "red flag" gun seizure law. The march comes as lawmakers hold hearings on several gun regulation bills. 

Janitorial workers rally in downtown Columbus on Sept. 16, 2019 to call for a higher minimum wage.
Paige Pfleger

Janitorial workers gathered in downtown Columbus on Monday afternoon to rally for a $15 minimum wage. 

Updated Nov. 8 at 5 p.m. ET

For nearly five months, Hong Kong's streets have seethed with discontent. Scenes from the semiautonomous region show protesters, sometimes numbering in the hundreds of thousands, many wearing surgical masks and carrying umbrellas that have come to signify resistance.

The images are astonishing, and the issues that set the protests in motion are complex.

So here's a primer breaking down the major players, why they have poured into the streets and the response so far from China.

When hundreds of thousands filled Hong Kong's streets on June 9 to protest a controversial extradition bill, the only mainland coverage came from China Daily, an English-language state newspaper geared towards overseas audiences.

It falsely labelled the march as one in support of the bill, which would allow extradition of some criminal defendants in Hong Kong to face trial in China. The state broadcaster, CCTV, kept its coverage to a minimum. China's government was silent.

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