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Gabe Rosenberg / WOsu

The Senate Judiciary Committee has approved changes to a bill, SB18, that would ban prison guards from shackling pregnant inmates.

This combination of undated images provided by the Gallia County Sheriff shows from left to right, Brynn Martin, Christopher Clemente, Troy McDaniel Jr. and Lawrence Lee III.
Gallia County Sheriff's Office via AP

Four inmates who overpowered two female corrections officers and escaped from an Ohio county jail were caught in North Carolina after slightly more than a day on the run, authorities in both states said.

Employment After Incarceration

Sep 19, 2019
Neil Conway / Flickr

If you’ve applied for a job lately, you probably have been asked to check a small box if you have ever been convicted of a felony.

For most people, that’s not a problem. But for thousands of ex-felons living in Ohio, where more than 850 laws and administrative rules restrict where former felons may work, it is. 

Today on All Sides, the changing policies and programs to help former felons after they’ve done their time. 

  

Guests:

The U.S. military court and prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, have cost more than $6 billion to operate since opening nearly 18 years ago and still churn through more than $380 million a year despite housing only 40 prisoners today.

Alisha Floyd and her son Chance were part of the Ohio Reformatory for Women's ABC Program.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Thursday marks the grand opening of a new home for the Ohio Reformatory for Women's Achieving Baby Care Success program (ABC). 

How Incarceration, Economic Decline Affect Opioid Deaths

Aug 26, 2019

As officials look for ways to stem the opioid epidemic, a lot of effort has been put into limiting narcotic prescriptions. But new research suggests underlying social issues -- like incarceration and poverty -- are linked to overdose deaths. 

Jeffrey Epstein And Suicide In Prison

Aug 20, 2019
FBI

The apparent prison suicide of accused sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein has cast a spotlight on the incidence of suicide in prison, which has increased over the last decade.

Experts blame staffing shortages and a lack of access to quality mental health services.  

Today on All Sides with Ann Fisher: prison protocols for suicide prevention. 

Yoel Alonso sat in a cell for 10 months before he ever met with a lawyer. His wife had to travel 1,000 miles to visit him at the remote Louisiana facility where he was detained.

Alonso is not imprisoned for committing a crime. In fact, he turned himself in to immigration officials last October, seeking asylum from Cuba. Since then, he has been detained in two rural facilities — first in Louisiana, and now in Adams County, Miss. — where he is faced with daunting legal hurdles. Chief among them: Alonso has met his lawyer only once in his nearly 11 months in federal custody.

Nearly half the people admitted to state prisons in the U.S. are there because of violations of probation or parole, according to a new nationwide study that highlights the personal and economic costs of the practice.

The Council of State Governments Justice Center said the majority of these violations are for "minor infractions," such as failing a drug test or missing a curfew. Those so-called technical violations cost states $2.8 billion every year, the report says.

Women In Prison

Jun 14, 2019
Pixabay

Incarceration rates have been decling-but not for women. The number of women in U.S prisons has increased since 1990, making rate of incarceration for women twice that of men.

This increase across the U.S and Ohio is accused to the opiod crisis which correelates to addiction-realted crimes. Still many women fight with addiction, mental and other health related issues.

Today on All Sides, the problem of women in prison and new solutions to respond.

Jamie Monghan is a prisoner at the Ohio Reformatory for Women. She lives in the Tapestry Unit for women in addiction recovery.
Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Heroin ran Stephanie Pollock's life. She woke up in the morning with heroin on her mind, her day revolved around it, and everything else including her three kids and her own well-being paled in comparison.

A New Approach For Women In Prison

May 30, 2019
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

The number of women in U.S. prisons has more than doubled since 1990. And the rate of incarceration for women is twice that of men.

Much of the increase is in Ohio and across the country is blamed on the opioid crisis, which has spurred a surge in addiction-related crime. And many incarcerated women still struggle with addiction, mental and other health issues.

Today on All Sides, the problem of women in prison and new approaches to respond.  

Should people convicted of a crime be allowed to vote while in prison?

It's a question that's divided 2020 Democratic presidential candidates and sparked attacks from President Trump and his allies.

At a CNN town hall event on April 22, presidential hopeful and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders was asked whether his support for allowing inmates to vote would extend to Boston Marathon bomber, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Tsarnaev has been sentenced to death for his role in the 2013 attack.

The Ohio Parole Board met to hear the clemency case of convicted killer and death row inmate Ronald Phillips in December 2016.
Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

After a former member slammed the state parole board for secrecy, a lack of diversity and issues with board members missing meetings, Gov. Mike DeWine has proposed changes and added three new members.

Inmates are among the least-educated people in America. That's despite research that shows education is one of the most effective ways to keep people from coming back to prison.

Now, there's renewed interest in giving adults behind bars better access to higher education. A new bipartisan bill in Congress would allow incarcerated people to use federal Pell Grants — designed for low-income students — to pay for higher education, including college classes and workforce training.

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