prescription painkillers

Chronic pain patients speak out against new rules for prescribing opioids Chronic pain patients at Ohio Statehouse.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Last year, Ohio changed its rules for prescribing opioids, restricting amounts of, and circumstances under which, doctors can prescribe those narcotics. The new rules have an exemption for people who are in hospice type care for diseases like cancer. 

A confidential government database of drug sales has become crucial to the nationwide opioid lawsuit in federal court in Cleveland.

The Automation of Reports and Consolidated Orders System, known as ARCOS, recorded painkiller sales between manufacturers, distributors and pharmacies at a time when overdose deaths surged nationwide.

In hospitals across the country, anesthesiologists and other doctors are facing significant shortages of injectable opioids. Drugs such as morphine, Dilaudid and fentanyl are the mainstays of intravenous pain control and are regularly used in critical care settings like surgery, intensive care units and hospital emergency departments.

A new report from the federal department that oversees Medicaid finds that prescribers in Ohio may still be overprescribing opioids in some cases.

The Department of Health and Human Services’ inspector general looked at opioid prescriptions for Medicaid participants in Ohio between June of 2016 and May of 2017.

  • They found that close to 5,000 Medicaid recipients received high doses of opioids in that period and more than 40,000 children under 18 received prescriptions.

     

FPS Groningen / Flickr

Bob Jones of Trumbull County has recurring pain from an old injury, but he isn’t going to be getting opioids. He never wanted them anyway, and found his own solution for pain relief. 

Thomas Bradley / WOSU News

With the opioid crisis killing an estimated 11 Ohioans a day, Gov. John Kasich announced new rules for monitoring the prescribing of painkillers to patients suffering chronic pain.

Correction:  This story has been updated to clarify that the study refers to addressing acute dental pain.

A new study reveals that over-the-counter medication may be more effective than opioids in treating acute dental pain.

Anita Aminoshariae is a professor at the School of Dental Medicine at Case Western and one of the authors of the study.

Chances are, you — or someone you know — has suffered from lower back pain.

It can be debilitating. It's a leading cause of disability globally.

And the number of people with the often-chronic condition is likely to increase.

It took several months and a team of half a dozen doctors, nurses and therapists to help Kim Brown taper off the opioid painkillers she’d been on for two years.

Brown had been taking the pills since an injury in 2014. It wasn’t until she met Dr. Dennis McManus, a neurologist who specializes in non-pharmacological approaches to pain management that she learned she had some control over her pain.

“That’s when life changed,” she said.


FPS Groningen / Flickr

The Ohio State Chiropractic Association is touting what its members believe to be a clear path Ohioans can take to cut down on opioid addiction. This path would take a culture change when it comes to the reputation of alternative medicine.

A few years ago, Renea Molden's doctors told her they wanted to take her off her opioid pills.

"I was mad, I'll be honest. I was mad. I was frustrated," she says.

Molden, of Kansas City, Mo., is 40 and struggles with chronic pain because of fibromyalgia, bulging disks and degenerative disk disease. Her doctors told her they worried about the possibility of her taking hydrocodone for the rest of her life. She told them those three pills she took every day seemed to be the only way she could make it through work, going shopping or even fixing dinner.

John Minchillo / Associated Press

Ohio's Republican Senator Rob Portman is backing a plan to cap opioid prescriptions and make it easier for people to access treatment.

Adam / Wikipedia

Some 12,000 Ohio doctors are being warned they appear to be violating a 2015 law that requires them to check patients' prescription histories against a state website before recommending prescription painkillers.