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pregnancy

Melissa Santiago and Nicole Dempsey say they both regreted having abortions when they were teenagers.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

This is the second of a two-part series on Ohioans and their experiences with abortion. Read part one here.

Nicole Dempsey remembers crying in a pew at church, watching a video of a woman with long dark hair and deep brown eyes. The woman was talking about her abortion, and how a local organization called Heartbeats helped her heal.

Marilyn Evans stands outside the Women's Med Center of Dayton, where both she and her daughter got abortions.
Paige Pfleger

This is the first of a two-part series on Ohioans and their experiences with abortion. Read part two here.

"This is the spot," Marilyn Evans says, standing in the empty parking lot of the Women’s Med Center in Kettering.

The Standards For Sex Education

May 15, 2019
US Embassy Canada / Flickr

Studies show that in some parts of the country, an increasing number of boys as young as 13 are having risky sex.

Improper -- or a lack of -- sex education in schools is part of the reason.

The costs are consequential. Risky sex can increase the incidence of pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases.

Today on All Sides, current standards for sex education.

When Akiya Parks first got to campus at the University of Florida, everything was new and exciting. Her mom and brother had driven her to campus and moved her into the dorms, she'd agreed to try a long-distance relationship with her high school boyfriend, she was ready to start a new chapter in Gainesville.

Kae Petrin
St. Louis Public Radio

Brittany "Tru" Kellman sometimes starts her day two hours before Jamaa Birth Village opens at 10 a.m., stashing diapers and snacks for the dozens of people who will come through the Ferguson nonprofit’s doors. She gives everyone a hug when she meets them.

Melody Lynch-Kimery had a fairly routine pregnancy. But when she got to the hospital for delivery, she says things quickly turned dangerous.

Need another reason to get the flu shot if you're pregnant?

A study out this week shows that pregnant women with the flu who are hospitalized in an intensive care unit are four times more likely to deliver babies prematurely and four and a half times more likely to have a baby of low birth weight.

Updated at 11:26 a.m.

The U.S. Supreme Court has reversed a lower court decision upholding a California law requiring anti-abortion crisis pregnancy centers to more fully disclose what they are.

London Scout / Unsplash

During her second pregnancy, 25-year old Jessica Roach thought she would have a smooth experience, like the first one, but her health deteriorated.

Columbus Public Health Dept.

Columbus public health officials say they can save lives by giving women addicted to drugs an easier way to care for their reproductive health care needs. At the CompDrug facility on the city's North Side, about 700 women are getting help from a new clinic that hopes to not just save lives, but improve them.

Jess Mador / WYSO

State health officials are promoting visiting nurse programs as part of a statewide strategy to reduce Ohio’s infant mortality rate. It’s persistently higher than the national rate, despite recent progress in reducing the number of sleep-related infant deaths.

When Sarah Scantling went into labor this summer, she had to drive 30 miles and across state lines.

Three years earlier, the only maternity ward where she lives in Pemiscot County, Missouri closed down. Scantling had to choose between a handful of other hospitals in the region between 20 and 70 miles away. She chose to give birth in the hospital in Dyersburg, Tennessee.


Wexner Medical Center

Six years ago, Maureen Sweeney worked at a Cleveland-area hospital in the labor and delivery unit. She helped hundreds of women deliver their children, many of whom were minors in their early teens.

Tia Hosler woke up at 7:35 a.m. on a friend’s couch next to her newborn son’s crib after an overnight babysitting gig.

The 26-year-old had slept through her alarm and was late for the bus, her ride to group therapy in Fort Wayne, Indiana. And now she had to scramble. She tied her Kool-Aid-red hair into a tight bun and kissed her 2-month-old, Marsean. 


Nurse Catherine “Bizz” Grimes moves like her name sounds: at a frenetic pace. She darts across the hall from the prenatal diagnosis clinic at Indiana University Health University Hospital in Indianapolis, sits down at her cubicle, puts on her headset over curly white blonde hair and starts dialing.

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