poverty

A Columbus grocery store has some empty space in the paper products aisle. Some stores are reporting items selling out or shortages of some items, such as hand sanitizer.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

As the coronavirus spreads, people are being urged to prepare by stocking up on food and supplies, checking to see if they can work from home if schools and workplaces are shut down, and staying home if they’re sick. But these aren’t options for many lower-income people in Ohio.

Transforming Struggling Neighborhoods

Jan 29, 2020
Smart Columbus self-driving shuttles are coming to Linden.
Smart Columbus

Residents in the Linden and Hilltop areas of Columbus have heard promises and solutions before. Over decades, they’ve watched their neighborhoods slide further into poverty, homelessness, joblessness and crime.

Changes to regulations of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) will soon take away benefits for thousands of Ohioans.

At least 29 counties are losing access to a waiver that makes the benefits more accessible. In those counties alone, about 20,000 people will lose food assistance benefits completely, said Loren Anthes, public policy fellow for the Center for Community Solutions.

It used to be that the battle to overcome inequality was about money. It was about helping the poor get better jobs so they could access a larger slice of the economic pie.

What if that approach to inequality is no longer relevant?

In the latest edition of its Human Development Report, the U.N. Development Programme (UNDP) argues that 20th-century thinking on global inequality no longer works in the 21st century.

The report warns that a new generation of inequities are driving street protests and damaging societies — and they're on track to get worse.

City officials in Las Vegas have passed a controversial law making it illegal to sleep or camp in downtown and residential public areas as long as there are open beds available at city homeless shelters.

Before the vote, protesters swarmed the Las Vegas City Council chambers with signs that read, "Poverty is not a crime," and chanting, "Housing, not handcuffs!"

The gap between the richest and the poorest U.S. households is now the largest it's been in the past 50 years — despite the median U.S. income hitting a new record in 2018, according to new data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

Disparities In Mental Health Services

Aug 15, 2019
Broadly Gender Spectrum Collection

For 50 years, the now-defunct Columbus Area Integrated Health Services served the near east side of Columbus and its largely African-American community.

When the agency closed shop in the spring, hundreds of people who had relied on its services were left with few options. Two other agencies have joined forces to fill the void, but the impact illustrates a historic disparity in mental health services for black people. 

Today on All Sides, we talk about the history and how Columbus organizations are working to address the problem of disparities in mental health services. 

WOSU

A coalition of groups that advocates for low-income Ohioans says the state has made considerable progress in the effort to reduce poverty, but there is much more work to be done.

Columbus Urban League president Stephanie Hightower at a press conference announcing Franklin County's new poverty reduction plan.
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

The Franklin County Board of Commissioners on Tuesday announced a plan to reduce poverty in Central Ohio.

As Republican-led states pass laws restricting abortion in hopes the Supreme Court will overturn its Roe v. Wade decision, supporters of abortion rights are pushing back.

Thousands of women who have had abortions have taken to social media to share their experience. Many argue they would have been worse off economically, had they been forced to deliver a baby.

"I didn't know what I would do with a baby," said Jeanne Myers, who was unmarried and unemployed when she got pregnant 36 years ago.

The Trump administration is considering changing the way the government measures poverty, which has anti-poverty groups worried that many low-income individuals will be pushed off assistance programs such as food stamps, Medicaid and Head Start.

The possible change would involve adjusting the poverty line annually using a different inflation measure, one that would result in a slower increase over time.

Gov. Mike DeWine says raising the gas tax from 28-cents a gallon to 46-cents a gallon will help fill a $1 billion construction budget shortfall, but the proposal has led to a debate over how it will impact Ohioans.

The 40-day Poor People's campaign will feature numerous events centered around non-violent activism.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

The Ohio Poor People's Campaign is kicking off their efforts for the new legislative session this week.

Ohio Governor John Kasich speaks during the Ohio State of the State address in the Fritsche Theater at Otterbein University in Westerville, Tuesday, March 6, 2018.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

Gov. John Kasich is celebrating a $500,000 donation from Pfizer as a major boost to the Foundation for Appalachian Ohio.

A Healthier Michigan / Flickr

Last year, nearly 1.6 million Ohioans lived in poverty. A new study is connecting poverty with health, showing where you live in Ohio has a lot to do with how healthy you are. 

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