polling places

Absentee mail-in ballots are getting most of the attention in the upcoming Nov. 3 presidential election, but in Ohio, county election officials have a much more potentially serious problem to deal with: a shortage of people to work the polling places on Election Day.

The NBA and its players union announced a plan to use arenas as polling places in the upcoming election as part of an agreement to resume playoff games on Saturday.

The deal comes after three games were postponed Wednesday, sparked by the Milwaukee Bucks refusing to play their scheduled game against the Orlando Magic. The players staged the walkout in response to the shooting of Jacob Blake, a Black man, by a police officer in Kenosha, Wis. Thursday's games were also postponed.

Franklin County Board of Elections during the delayed spring election on April 28, 2020.
Ryan Hitchcock / WOSU

This year’s election is going to look very different, and the Franklin County Board of Elections on Monday voted on various stop gap measures to meet the needs of a COVID-19 election.

Election officials around the state are trying to recruit 35,000 poll workers for Election Day in November. Leaders are weighing-in on what conditions poll workers might face when people cast their ballots in-person, which includes if people will be required to wear masks.

Franklin County Board of Elections during the delayed spring election on April 28, 2020.
Ryan Hitchcock / WOSU

In four months, Ohio voters will cast their ballots. Election officials are trying to make sure everyone who wants to vote can, while keeping everyone safe from the pandemic that's currently surging around the country.

Secretary LaRose (right) showing a resident the new machine at National Church Residences in Columbus.
Nick Evans / WOSU

With one week until the Ohio primary, the state’s boards of elections are moving 128 polling places at nursing homes and senior residential facilities over concerns about coronavirus.

Nick Evans / WOSU

Voters across Ohio head to the polls Tuesday, and there's a lot of decisions to make. For one Franklin County resident, though, Election Day raises another question: How exactly do we pick polling locations, anyways?