politically speaking

My hometown – Dayton, Ohio – deserves credit for a lot of things over the years: powered flight, the cash register, Huffy Bicycles, the pop-top soda can and hundreds of other inventions.

But Dayton and its surrounding communities rarely get the credit they deserve.

Last week, when a three-judge panel of the U.S. District Court for Southern Ohio found the congressional district map Ohio has been using since 2012 to be unconstitutional and rigged in favor of the Republicans, there was a disparate range of emotions from one end of the political spectrum to the other.

The current storyline in the 2020 presidential campaign goes something like this:

Donald Trump and his allies run a campaign demonizing Democrats in general as horrid, lying socialists who hate America with a passion, who wouldn't be caught dead in a cheap foam hat that says Make America Great Again because they want to destroy it.

Ohio, which had a reputation as the nation's ultimate bellwether state in presidential elections, threw everyone for a loop in 2016 when voters here chose Donald Trump over Hillary Clinton.

Before we start imagining the possibility of busloads of undocumented immigrants being bused from the nation's southern border and dumped on to Fountain Square because Cincinnati is a "sanctuary city," let's consider one thing.

For the time being, an Ohio group has pulled out of a ballot issue this year to have the state join a nationwide movement to bypass the Electoral College and elect the president by popular vote.

Ohio seems to be in one of its political mood swings again.

It happens every generation or so, and this one seems to favor the Republicans.

If Sandusky, Ohio, blazes a trail, does Cincinnati follow?

We may soon find out.

Ordinarily, a U.S. senator endorsing the president of his own party for re-election would be nothing out of the ordinary.

That's what you would expect the senator to do, right? Under ordinary circumstances, that is.

I suppose this debate over whether Ohio is a red state, a purple state, or blue state with a very faint pulse is going to go on for quite a while.

Ohio's new governor has changed personas several times in his long, long, long career in politics and now, as Ohio's brand-spanking new governor, seems to be in the process of doing it again.

Before I go off on the Ohio General Assembly for the seemingly self-serving, politics-as-usual act of recently attaching an amendment giving themselves pay raises to a bill dealing with survivor benefits for fallen police officers and firefighters, let me make one thing clear.

I do believe our state representatives and state senators deserve a raise.

You tell me if this makes sense.

Ohio has 16 congressional districts - for the moment, at least.

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