politically speaking | WOSU Radio

politically speaking

Youngstown-area U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan takes a selfie with a delegate at the 2016 Democratic Party Convention.
Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

We're still almost two years away from the time when the numbers geeks hired by the political parties in Ohio put on their green eyeshades and load their U.S. Census data into their computers and begin turning out a brand-new congressional district map.

He just can't leave it alone. Donald Trump had to find some way to make America's most patriotic holiday – Independence Day – about him.

Sometimes, when there is a hot-button issue before the nine justices of the U.S. Supreme Court, I am asked what I think the black-robed sages will do.

My answer is always the same.

My hometown – Dayton, Ohio – deserves credit for a lot of things over the years: powered flight, the cash register, Huffy Bicycles, the pop-top soda can and hundreds of other inventions.

But Dayton and its surrounding communities rarely get the credit they deserve.

Last week, when a three-judge panel of the U.S. District Court for Southern Ohio found the congressional district map Ohio has been using since 2012 to be unconstitutional and rigged in favor of the Republicans, there was a disparate range of emotions from one end of the political spectrum to the other.

The current storyline in the 2020 presidential campaign goes something like this:

Donald Trump and his allies run a campaign demonizing Democrats in general as horrid, lying socialists who hate America with a passion, who wouldn't be caught dead in a cheap foam hat that says Make America Great Again because they want to destroy it.

Ohio, which had a reputation as the nation's ultimate bellwether state in presidential elections, threw everyone for a loop in 2016 when voters here chose Donald Trump over Hillary Clinton.

Before we start imagining the possibility of busloads of undocumented immigrants being bused from the nation's southern border and dumped on to Fountain Square because Cincinnati is a "sanctuary city," let's consider one thing.

For the time being, an Ohio group has pulled out of a ballot issue this year to have the state join a nationwide movement to bypass the Electoral College and elect the president by popular vote.

Ohio seems to be in one of its political mood swings again.

It happens every generation or so, and this one seems to favor the Republicans.

If Sandusky, Ohio, blazes a trail, does Cincinnati follow?

We may soon find out.

Ordinarily, a U.S. senator endorsing the president of his own party for re-election would be nothing out of the ordinary.

That's what you would expect the senator to do, right? Under ordinary circumstances, that is.

I suppose this debate over whether Ohio is a red state, a purple state, or blue state with a very faint pulse is going to go on for quite a while.

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