police reform

Columbus Council members Emmanuel Remy and Shayla Favor, Mayor Andrew Ginther, and members Elizabeth Brown and Rob Dorans at an October press conference.
Columbus City Council / Facebook

Columbus City Council held a meeting Monday to outline its public safety plans ahead of budget deliberations.

Columbus Police confront protesters at a demonstration downtown on June 2, 2020.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Columbus residents voted overwhelmingly last week to add more oversight of police. Issue 2, which passed with about 74% of the vote, creates a new Civilian Review Board and an inspector general for the Columbus Division of Police. 

Voters this week had their say on what police reform would look like, approving dozens of measures that will begin shaping policies at departments across the country.

Franklin County Prosecutor Ron O'Brien giving closing arguments in the case of Quentin Smith, who killed two Westerville Police officers, on Oct. 31, 2019.
Fred Squillante / Pool/Columbus Dispatch

Long-time Republican prosecutor Ron O'Brien lost his bid for a seventh term. O'Brien conceded the race early Wednesday morning to Democratic retired judge Gary Tyack.

Lion statue in front of Columbus Division of Police Central Headquarters.
David Holm / WOSU

Columbus residents strongly approved the creation of a Civilian Review Board to carry out independent investigations of police misconduct, as well as the appointment of an inspector general for the Columbus Division of Police. With 100% of precincts reporting on election night, a clear majority voted in favor of the issue.

Franklin County Prosecutor Ron O'Brien, right, speaks alongside Cincinnati Police Chief Eliot Isaac, left, during a news conference to discuss cases linked to Samuel Little, Friday, June 7, 2019, in Columbus.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

No-knock warrants have gotten a lot of attention – most notably in the death of Breonna Taylor, who was killed in March during a shootout between her boyfriend and police in Louisville, Ky.

A Columbus Police officer aims a pepper spray cannister at a protester's face on May 30, 2020.
Katie Forbes / Kforbesphotography

The killing of Minneapolis man George Floyd in May sparked protests across the nation. Since his death, there’s been a stream of Columbus demonstrations demanding police reform. 

Police Reform

Oct 2, 2020
A protester holds up a sign saying "Defund the police" on June 6, 2020, in New York.
Ragan Clark / Associated Press

This episode originally aired Sept. 22, 2020.

Calls for police reform sparked by the police killings of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor have echoed in cities and statehouses across the country.

Adora Namigadde

Protesters gathered outside the Ohio Statehouse on Wednesday evening after a grand jury charged one Louisville Police officer in the botched narcotics raid that led to Breonna Taylor's death.

Protesters on the sidewalk of the Ohio Statehouse face Columbus Police officers, who stood in the middle of High Street, on June 1, 2020.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

An Ohio board is developing a statewide standard for police departments to follow when dealing with mass protests.

Police in riot gear in front of a protest at the Ohio Statehouse.
Jo Ingles / Statehouse News Bureau

Columbus City Council on Monday decided to table proposed restrictions on the police department's use of military equipment and non-lethal weapons like tear gas.

Columbus Police confront protesters at a demonstration downtown on June 2, 2020.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

An independent review of complaints against Columbus Police during this summer's protests found that the vast majority of excessive force allegations were unprovable due to lack of evidence or an inability to identify officers.

Paige Pfleger / WOSU

This is part two of a two-part series about race inside Columbus Division of Police. Read part one here

Editor’s Note: This story has been updated to include comments from Columbus Public Safety Director Ned Pettus, who oversees the Columbus Division of Police. He was interviewed prior to publication, but his comments were erroneously not included in the original story.

The police shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosa, Wis., resonated with Roy Divine, who grew up 30 miles from the Milwaukee suburb, but says it "didn't feel that different" than the police killing of George Floyd that sparked nationwide protests earlier this summer.

A Columbus Police officer speaks to protesters during demonstrations over police brutality and racism.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

This is part one of a two-part series about race inside the Columbus Division of Police. Read part two here.

Editor’s Note: This story has been updated to include comments from Columbus Public Safety Director Ned Pettus, who oversees the Columbus Division of Police. He was interviewed prior to publication, but his comments were erroneously not included in the original story.

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