Pittsburgh shooting | WOSU Radio

Pittsburgh shooting

Friday evening marks the first Shabbat since the Pittsburgh synagogue massacre last weekend, and Jewish leaders want Americans of all faiths to come and send, "a resounding message that love triumphs over hate."

The American Jewish Committee (AJC) is spearheading the effort using the #ShowUpForShabbat social media campaign. It is to both show solidarity for the 11 victims killed at the Tree of Life synagogue, but also to signal that the Jewish community will not live in fear.

Three men are in custody, charged in three separate cases of domestic extremism last week.

Two were deadly shootings — one at a synagogue in Pittsburgh, Pa., the other at a grocery store in Louisville, Ky. — and the third involved explosives sent through the mail from Florida.

The suspects fit a pattern well-established in recent years: troubled, American-born men who appeared to be acting alone and driven by hate.

Us Together Director Nadia Kasvin
Nick Evans / WOSU

Last weekend's mass shooting in Pittsbugh loomed large over a conference about refugee resettlement held in Columbus on Tuesday.

Nick Castele / ideastream

The Anti-Defamation League says the mass shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue over the weekend has left Ohio’s Jews in a state of shock. While synagogues step up security measures, congregations have held vigils around the state to remember those killed at the Tree Of Life.

Democrat Ken Harbaugh (left) and Republican Bob Gibbs at their only debate one week before election day.
M.L. Schultze / ideastream

At the only debate in Ohio’s 7th Congressional District race, the candidates collided on the expected issues including healthcare, tax cuts and national security, but the killing of 11 people at a synagogue in Pittsburgh last week came up as well.

Hours after the synagogue shooting in Pittsburgh, President Trump denounced the attack.

"The scourge of anti-Semitism cannot be ignored, cannot be tolerated," Trump said on Saturday at a campaign rally in Illinois.

But some are still troubled by what the president has not said about the synagogue killings. Authorities say the alleged shooter was motivated by hatred of Jews. On social media, the shooter also raged against immigrants.

Ohio State Wexner Jewish Student Center

This weekend's mass shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue, which left 11 dead and several others injured, spurred Jewish leaders in Central Ohio to step up their security measures.

Updated at 6:50 a.m. ET Monday

The alternative social media network that was reportedly used by the suspect in the deadly shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue is now down.

Updated Oct. 31 at 4:34 p.m. ET

Eleven people were killed on Saturday when a gunman entered Pittsburgh's Tree of Life synagogue and opened fire on the congregants. The victims ranged in age from 54 to 97; eight were men, three were women. Two of them were brothers, and two were a married couple.

Chuck Diamond was a rabbi at Tree of Life until about a year ago, and he remains a member of the community, living just around the corner from the synagogue. He knew many of the victims.

At a press conference Sunday morning, officials said victims of a shooting rampage at a Pittsburgh synagogue range in age from 54 to 97. All but two of the victims were over the age of 65, and include one married couple, and two brothers. Six others were wounded, including four police officers.

The Allegheny County Chief Medical Examiner released a list of congregants killed in the attack:

Joyce Fienberg, 75, of Oakland, City of Pittsburgh

Richard Gottfried, 65, of Ross Township

Updated at 12:14 a.m. ET on Sunday

Federal prosecutors have charged Robert Bowers, the 46-year-old suspected gunman who carried out a mass shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue Saturday morning, with 29 counts in the deaths of 11 people, The Associated Press reports.

"Please know that justice in this case will be swift and it will be severe," Scott Brady, the chief federal prosecutor in western Pennsylvania, said at a news conference, according to the AP, describing the massacre as a "terrible and unspeakable act of hate."