pipelines

Updated 4:40 p.m.

In Atlanta today, President Trump announced a "top to bottom overhaul" of the regulations that govern one of the nation's most significant environmental laws. The aim is to speed up approval for major projects like pipelines and highways, but critics say it could sideline the concerns of poor and minority communities impacted by those projects, and discount their impact on climate change.

Updated at 2:40 p.m.

A federal judge has ruled that the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline must be emptied for now while the Army Corps of Engineers produces an environmental review.

In a decision posted Monday, U.S. District Judge James Boasberg said that it was clear shutting down the pipeline will cause disruption. But he said that "the seriousness of the Corps' deficiencies outweighs the negative effects of halting the oil flow" during the estimated 13 months it will take to complete the environmental impact statement.

The Appalachian Trail – the 2,200-mile hiking stretch that goes from Georgia to Maine — is at the center of a legal battle that has risen to the Supreme Court.

The case involves a proposed pipeline that would connect natural gas fracked in West Virginia to population centers in Virginia and North Carolina. The Atlantic Coast Pipeline would cross the Appalachian Trail within the George Washington National Forest in Virginia, and some environmental groups are challenging the legality of the permit the U.S. Forest Service issued allowing that to happen.

Demonstrators shouting chants outside of a House Public Utilities Committee hearing in the Ohio Statehouse.
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

A coalition of advocates say an Ohio bill that creates a new criminal mischief prohibition can have a chilling effect on protesting at places like oil and gas pipelines.

A truck passes a sign against the NEXUS pipeline on the property of Kathy Cikotte, in Berlin Heights, Ohio, on July 16, 2015.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

An advocacy group is opposing an Ohio bill that would restrict protests at sites that are considered "critical infrastructure facilities,” including oil and gas pipelines.

Updated at 1:40 E.T.

In one of his most sweeping environmental proposals so far, President Trump says he wants to streamline an "outrageously slow and burdensome federal approval process" that can delay major infrastructure projects for years.

Supporters from the fossil fuel, construction, ranching and other industries welcome the move, which they've long sought. Environmental groups warn it would sideline the climate impacts of highways, pipelines and other projects, and they promise a legal challenge.

Updated: 12:39 p.m., Friday Dec. 20, 2019.

A tax reassessment requested by a gas transmission company has Lorain County officials frustrated by the possibility of losing nearly 40 percent of the expected taxes before the county has collected any money at all.

The NEXUS pipeline was initially estimated to bring $9 million to Lorain County, but the company is appealing to the Ohio Department of Taxation for a reassessment of its value.

On a windy night in Billings, Mont., Patricia Iron Cloud and about 60 others were protesting the Keystone XL pipeline ahead of a public meeting on Oct. 29. It was the public's first and only chance to meet with U.S. State Department officials about a new environmental analysis of the Keystone XL pipeline.

"I think it's at least 19 degrees right now," Iron Cloud said, shaking in a traditional ribbon skirt and ballet flats with no socks. "Who does that?"

A truck passes a sign against the NEXUS pipeline on the property of Kathy Cikotte, in Berlin Heights, Ohio, on July 16, 2015.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Landowners in Ohio hope to convince a federal appeals court that they were forced by a federal agency to sell their property to a pipeline builder sending large quantities of natural gas to Canada.

A U.S. district judge has issued an order blocking construction of the controversial transnational Keystone XL Pipeline until the State Department conducts further study of its impact on the environment.

Judge Brian Morris' 54-page order, issued late Thursday, overturns the Trump administrations's approval last year of the proposed 1,179-mile pipeline and at least temporarily prevents it from being built.

Ohio EPA

West Virginia regulators have issued a $430,000 fine for permit violations against the company behind the 713-mile Rover Pipeline, which has racked up millions of dollars in damages from its construction through Ohio.

Nexus Pipeline
Pan Demin/Shutterstock

Green City Council voted 4-3 Wednesday night to settle with the builders of the NEXUS, after suing to stop the construction of the natural gas pipeline.