pipeline

Inequities in the dollars used to fund schools have been a problem in Ohio for decades.

Education funding depends on local home values, business investments, levies that pass or fail, and in some areas, it also depends on whether a natural gas pipeline runs through your school district.

In a fairly rural district in Northeast Ohio, the construction of a controversial pipeline could mean a multi-million-dollar windfall, and after years of belt-tightening, district officials are dreaming up potential ways to spend it.

Cloverleaf Local Schools

It's been four years since an oil pipeline in Colerain Township ruptured, spewing thousands of gallons of crude down a hillside creek at Oak Glen Nature Preserve. In 2016, the focus shifted from cleaning the site, to restoration. That process is nearing completion.

Ohio EPA

Earlier this month, for the second time in less than a year, the Rover Pipeline project leaked drilling mud at its construction site near the Tuscawaras River in Stark County.

Construction of the Rover Pipeline in Shelby, Ohio.
Trayden Schumacher / YouTube

The final say on building interstate pipelines, like the controversial NEXUS and Rover natural gas lines across northern Ohio, rests with FERC—the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.  And its newly appointed chairman has come on board saying it’s time to review the agency’s pipeline policies.

Nexus Pipeline
Pan Demin/Shutterstock

The federal tax overhaul passed in December by Congress is raising questions about how changes may affect Ohio’s the energy industry.

The Keystone XL pipeline, an $8 billion project that has attracted significant protest from environmental groups, has cleared a major regulatory hurdle on its path to completion. On Monday, the Nebraska Public Service Commission certified the pipeline to run through the state.

Matthew Richmond / ideastream

The site of what’s alleged to be a 2 million-gallon spill of drilling mud is now just a quiet spot along the towpath trail south of Canton.

Nexus Pipeline
Pan Demin/Shutterstock

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission gave final authorization Wednesday to begin construction of the NEXUS gas pipeline through northern Ohio. Communities along the way have tried to stop or re-route the pipeline, and lawsuits are still pending.   

Nexus Pipeline
Pan Demin/Shutterstock

The developers behind the NEXUS natural gas pipeline want to begin construction by October 10.  

Construction of the Rover Pipeline in Shelby, Ohio.
Trayden Schumacher / YouTube

Activity in Ohio’s Utica Shale play has been slowly increasing in 2017 as long-term infrastructure projects, like pipelines and processing plants, have come online.

WMFD/Screenshot by WOSU

Late on Friday, the federal government approved a $2 billion natural gas pipeline that will pass through Northern Ohio on its way to Michigan, but the widespread opposition to the project isn’t giving up just yet.

Nexus Pipeline
Pan Demin/Shutterstock

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has approved the NEXUS natural gas pipeline, which would run across parts of Summit and Stark Counties in Ohio.

They landed, one after another, in 2015: plans for nearly a dozen interstate pipelines to move natural gas beneath rivers, mountains and people's yards. Like spokes on a wheel, they'd spread from Appalachia to markets in every direction.

Together these new and expanded pipelines — comprising 2,500 miles of steel in all — would double the amount of gas that could flow out of Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia. The cheap fuel will benefit consumers and manufacturers, the developers promise.

A federal judge in Washington, D.C., ruled Wednesday that the Trump administration failed to follow proper environmental procedures when it granted approval to the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline project.

It's a legal victory for the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and environmentalists, who protested for months against the pipeline. Oil started flowing through it earlier this month. The tribe fears that the pipeline, which crosses the Missouri River just upstream of its reservation, could contaminate its drinking water and sacred lands.

Agency Won't Let Company Resume Drilling For Gas Pipeline

May 27, 2017
Google / Creative Commons

A federal agency has told a company building a high-pressure natural gas pipeline it cannot resume drilling beneath creeks in southeast Ohio and northern West Virginia.

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Thursday rejected Texas-based Energy Transfers' request to resume horizontal drilling. The $4.2 billion Rover Pipeline project will carry gas from Appalachian shale fields across Ohio and to other states.

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