Pepper spray

Police in riot gear in front of a protest at the Ohio Statehouse.
Jo Ingles / Statehouse News Bureau

Columbus City Council on Monday decided to table proposed restrictions on the police department's use of military equipment and non-lethal weapons like tear gas.

A Columbus Police officer aims a pepper spray cannister at a protester's face on May 30, 2020.
Katie Forbes / Kforbesphotography

A federal appeals court ruled a Columbus Police officer is protected by qualified immunity after pepper-spraying a protester in 2017. 

Video purports to show a protester whose prosthetic limbs were removed by Columbus Police during demonstrations Sunday.
meanmrbadger / Reddit

Columbus Police released video footage Monday to push back on allegations that officers took away the prosthetic limbs of a protester during a clash Sunday afternoon.

State troopers and police officers blocking the intersection of High and State streets. Police vehicles took over the center turning lane for nearly two blocks of High Street between Broad and Town Streets on Sunday, June 21, 2020.
Nick Evans / WOSU

A rift is emerging between Columbus City Council and Mayor Andrew Ginther after police officers deployed pepper spray against protesters over the weekend, less than a week after the city banned the use of chemical agents against non-violent crowds.

Police and demonstrators on Broad and High Streets.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Columbus Police in riot gear returned to downtown Sunday afternoon, intent on forcing protesters out of city streets—and using chemicals like pepper spray to do so.

Columbus Police confront protesters at a demonstration downtown on June 2, 2020.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Columbus Police will no longer use tear gas to disperse peaceful crowds, Mayor Andrew Ginther announced Tuesday. 

Columbus Police used tear gas to disperse protesters on May 31, soon after arriving downtown.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Exercise restraint. Use only the minimum amount of lawful force. Do not show anger.

Every officer in training in Ohio is taught crowd control policies, outlined in a document that Columbus Police Chief Tom Quinlan helped write. Following recent demonstrations over police violence, however, protesters question if Quinlan’s officers followed those guidelines.

Protesters hit with tear gas by Columbus Police on Saturday, May 30, 2020.
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

This last week's protests have been dominated by stories of Columbus Police officers using tear gas and pepper spray on crowds of protesters. But this isn’t the first time their tactics have drawn criticism. 

Protesters on the sidewalk of the Ohio Statehouse face Columbus Police officers, who stood in the middle of High Street, on June 1, 2020.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Columbus City Attorney Zach Klein is recommending the appointment of a special counsel to perform an independent investigation into Columbus Division of Police, following complaints about the department's use of force during recent protests.

Protesters at the Ohio Statehouse lay on the ground chanting "I can't breathe" on Monday, June 1, 2020.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Columbus' fifth full day of protests remained mostly peaceful, with police walking and even kneeling alongside protesters, until just after curfew when officers met demonstrators with pepper spray on the Ohio State campus.

Rep. Joyce Beatty, the Ohio Democrat who was pepper-sprayed at a demonstration in Columbus on Saturday, says property destruction accompanying protests over the death of George Floyd is a "distraction to the message."

Speaking to NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday, Beatty said she understands the sentiment that attempting to have a "healthy dialogue" about race hasn't worked, but that "violence doesn't work — violence either way."