Peggy Lehner

Kantele Franko / Associated Press

Many of the students enrolled in Ohio's largest online charter school when it closed in January have transferred to other schools, but state officials don't know what happened with about 2,300 students.

Kantele Franko / Associated Press

In their final sessions before summer break, the Ohio General Assembly sent two bills to the governor that attempt to clean up funding for the state’s online charter school system. Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle believe this is an important step toward more transparency and accountability. 

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The Ohio classes of 2019 and 2020 could be allowed the same alternative options for earning a high school diploma as this year’s seniors.

The Ohio Board of Education voted 16-1 Tuesday to allow students to graduate by pursuing alternative pathways, like completing a senior project or obtaining an industry credential.

Sen. Peggy Lehner (R-Kettering) proposes bill to ban expulsions and out-of-school suspensions for young students.
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

A state senator wants to toss out the idea of expulsions for kids who are in third grade or younger. The lawmaker says this can go a long way to closing the achievement gap for disadvantaged students.

school desk
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The bad grades for many school districts in the latest round of report cards has upset some parents and school officials. And now they’ve angered a state lawmaker who says he’s writing a bill to change the report cards.

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Next year’s graduating high school senior must get a good score over seven different final tests or on a college entrance exam, or earn an industry credential.

As many as 47,000 high school juniors are potentially on track to fail to meet those standards. An amendment that may be attached to the budget in the Senate seeks to help those students.

State Board of Education member Tess Elshoff wrote the resolution to create a work group for further study.
Mark Urycki

The State Board of Education is holding off plan to enforce strict new graduation requirements for high school students. The change came when local school superintendents said nearly 30 percent of students may not make it.