parental leave

Paid Parental Leave

Jan 30, 2020
Rep. Kristin Boggs, from left, Rep. Janine Boyd and Elizabeth Brown, executive Columbus City Council member and director of Ohio Womens Public Policy Network, discuss a bill that would require 12 weeks of paid family leave in Ohio.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

The United States is one of three countries that do not offer some form of parental leave to new parents. 

Tucked inside a must-pass defense bill expected to make its way through the Republican-controlled Senate next week is a sweeping policy change: 12 weeks of paid parental leave for all 2.1 million federal employees.

It's not a surprise that Carolyn Maloney, a Democratic congresswoman from New York, would be celebrating the move. She's been working to get it passed for two decades, after her own experience in the workplace.

Federal workers are on the cusp of getting 12 weeks of paid parental leave, thanks to a landmark proposal making its way through Congress.

The House on Wednesday passed the measure, which is slated for a Senate vote next week and is expected to become law.

"The idea that you could be at home for 12 weeks would be a real game changer, I think, for people — myself included," says Becky Williams, who works as an analyst at the U.S. State Department.

Updated at 11:27 a.m. ET

Two years ago, Derek Rotondo told his employer that he wanted to take 16 weeks of paid leave granted to primary caregivers for his newborn son. He says he was told: "Men, as biological fathers, were presumptively not the primary caregiver." He was only eligible for two weeks' leave.

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Franklin County Commissioners have approved a new paid family leave policy. About 1,400 workers in Franklin County can now get two weeks of their normal pay when taking time off under the family leave program. 

ACLU of Ohio

When Derek Rotondo's wife became pregnant last year, he started looking into parental leave options at JPMorgan Chase in Columbus, where he's an associate investigator. But Rotondo says he was denied leave as a primary caregiver.