Oregon District Shooting | WOSU Radio

Oregon District Shooting

Credit John Minchillo / Associated Press

A mass shooting in Dayton's Oregon District early Sunday, Aug. 3, 2019, killed 9 people and injured 26 others.

Follow our continuing coverage below.

Gov. Mike DeWine speaks during a public inauguration ceremony at the Ohio Statehouse, Monday, Jan. 14, 2019, in Columbus, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Gov. Mike DeWine continues to defend his "STRONG Ohio" gun legislation proposal, details of which he released Monday.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley is reacting to Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed changes to state gun laws. The governor unveiled details of his so-called STRONG Ohio bill Monday afternoon in Columbus.

Among the bill's proposed changes are voluntary measures allowing private gun buyers and sellers to request proof of background checks. The proposal would also expand the criteria used to keep guns out of the hands of people who pose a danger to themselves or others. 

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, left, speaks alongside Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, right, during a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton.
John Minchillo / AP

Two months after the mass shooting in Dayton spurred Gov. Mike DeWine to take action against gun violence, the governor has released details about the official bill he's presenting to lawmakers. The legislation won't include two significant gun control measures DeWine previously supported, however.

Students at the University of Dayton plan to rally Friday, Oct. 4 in favor of gun reform. Organizers say they coordinated the campus protest to mark the two-month anniversary of Dayton’s deadly August mass shooting that killed nine people and injured another three dozen others.

Student organizer Cierra Stewart says she wants lawmakers to strengthen background checks and tighten firearm-sales regulations.

People affected by the Aug. 4, 2019 mass shooting in the Oregon District are now able to apply for funds through the foundation’s Dayton Oregon District Tragedy Fund.

Anyone physically injured in the shooting and the families or representatives of the nine people who lost their lives are eligible to apply.

Gov. Mike DeWine signs the executive order creating the Ohio Narcotics Intelligence Center on July 31, 2019.
Olivia Miltner / WOSU

Gov. Mike DeWine's 17-point plan to address gun violence in the state following the recent mass shooting includes freeing up space at state psychiatric hospitals for people threatening violence or suicide.

Visitors entering Dayton’s Oregon District near Smokin Bar-B-Que and The Neon movie theatre will now be greeted by a roughly 3,000-square-foot mural. 

The giant art piece is the work of Dayton artist Tiffany Clark, and while it was planned before the Aug. 4 mass shooting, its completion two months after the massacre holds special meaning for some residents and business owners in the neighborhood.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine says he expects to share the language of a gun-reform package with state lawmakers within days. The proposal would include measures the governor first discussed in the wake of the August 4 mass shooting in Dayton. 

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley testified on Capitol Hill Wednesday in support of stricter gun controls.

Speaking before a House Judiciary Committee Hearing on Assault Weapons, Whaley called on lawmakers to take assault weapons off the streets to stop shootings similar to the one in the city’s Oregon District that left nine people dead and nearly three dozen others injured.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, left, speaks alongside Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, right, during a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton.
John Minchillo / AP

More than 3,600 people have written letters, emails and made phone calls to Gov. Mike DeWine in the month following the deadly mass shooting in Dayton.

Mourners gather for a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

An Ohio Senate committee is holding hearings on several pieces of gun legislation on Tuesday. Some of the bills being heard in the Government Oversight and Reform Committee won the support of Republicans following last month’s Dayton mass shooting.

More than 50 people attended the first of two Oregon District Tragedy Fund public meetings at Sinclair Community College Monday. The meetings are designed to gather public comments on how the fund’s $3 million in donations should be distributed to survivors and victims’ families. Many people who testified pleaded with the fund's oversight committee to help people living with shooting-related injuries. 

Dayton themed tattoos have become popular across the city since the mass shooting in the Oregon District last month. People are getting Gem City designs, Dayton Strong ink, the shape of the state with a star where the city lies.

Class is back in session in many Dayton area school districts. Hundreds of students in those districts were, in some way, affected by both the Memorial Day tornadoes and the Oregon District mass shooting. 

Some districts say they are responding to students’ mental health needs, but the need for those services has already been rising in recent years.

In the Trotwood Madison City School District, 226 students were displaced by the May tornadoes. Officials say they’re seeing students with signs of trauma related to the tornado and the shooting. 

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley joined a group of Congressional Democrats in Washington Monday to lobby for tighter gun regulations. The group that included Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer is calling for passage of a bill to expand background checks for gun purchases.

The bipartisan proposal known as H.R.8 would expand background checks to cover private firearm sales.

Mayor Whaley urged the Senate to bring the House bill to a vote.

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