opioid epidemic | WOSU Radio

opioid epidemic

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine speaks during a public inauguration ceremony at the Ohio Statehouse, Monday, Jan. 14, 2019, in Columbus.
Ty Greenlees / AP/Dayton Daily News, Pool

Gov. Mike DeWine will propose the creation of 30 new specialty dockets, known as drug courts, as part of his budget expected to be officially released Friday. The move is one of DeWine's first major announcements when it comes to fighting the opioid crisis.

The number of opioid prescriptions in Ohio has declined 36 percent from 2012 to 2018, according to a new report from the Ohio Board of Pharmacy. The decline follows regulations put in place at the state level over the last few years.

Charlie Neibergall / Associated Press

Ohio doctors are prescribing fewer opioids while pharmacists are dispensing fewer doses, according to a state report released Monday.

A jug of used needles to exchange in Camden, N.J., on Oct. 29, 2015.
Mel Evans / Associated Press

A new report by The Center for Community Solutions shows that programs that get used syringes off the streets in Ohio have more than doubled in the last three years.

The DeWine administration's public health cabinet is acknowledged at the State of the State address on March 5, 2019 at the Ohio Statehouse.
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

In his State of the State speech, Governor Mike DeWine said he will have a team of cabinet members dedicated to dealing with public health including opioid abuse, mental health services and the health of families. That idea is getting good reviews right now.

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine speaks during a public inauguration ceremony at the Ohio Statehouse, Monday, Jan. 14, 2019, in Columbus.
Ty Greenlees / AP/Dayton Daily News, Pool

Gov. Mike DeWine is expected to bolster arguments for raising the Ohio gas tax by 18 cents, promote programs to improve children's lives and discuss plans for fighting the opioid epidemic in the Republican governor's first State of the State speech Tuesday.

You can stream his speech below, courtesy of ideastream. The speech is set to begin at noon.

As of July 1, the Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation will no longer pay for a powerful painkiller that’s at the center of the opioid crisis here in the Buckeye State. 

The opioid epidemic has touched the lives of thousands of people across the Miami Valley. As part of our coverage of the crisis, WYSO wanted to know what our listeners wanted to know. We collected dozens of questions, a lot of them from people wondering how best to help a loved one struggling with addiction or recovery, and how to find support for themselves.

Deterra Drug disposal kit
Deterra / YouTube

There’s a new anti-drug effort that involves a variety of groups from around the state.

After months of threats, federal prosecutors in Philadelphia launched a legal challenge on Wednesday against the nonprofit Safehouse, which is hoping to open what could be the nation's first site where people with opioid addiction can use drugs under medical supervision.

Gov. Mike DeWine speaks with addiction treatment providers in Columbus on Jan. 29, 2019.
Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

Gov. Mike DeWine and leaders of his program to fight opioid abuse are meeting with local advocates from around Ohio to share ideas.

Vivitrol, a relapse prevention drug.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

It’s a busy morning in Franklin County’s municipal courthouse. People stream through metal detectors, and elbow their way into elevators.

Naloxone And Harm Reduction In Ohio

Jan 16, 2019
Naloxone is an antidote that can help reverse drug overdoses.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Opioid deaths dropped by nearly a third in Hamilton County following an aggressive program to get an opioid antidote into the community.

Naloxone, also known as Narcan, can be administered via needle or nasal spray. And anyone can do it.

That’s one example of how cities in Ohio and across the country are working with the life-saving drug.

Coming up on All Sides with Ann Fisher, the age of Naloxone.

The main entrance to Mount Carmel West Hospital is shown Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019.
Andrew Welsh-Huggins / Associated Press

Janet Kavanaugh was 79 years old and near death when she was transferred from an assisted care facility to Mount Carmel West hospital in Columbus. Her family requested that lifesaving measures be stopped, and that Kavanaugh be comfortable for her remaining time.

Surrounded by family and friends on his farm in Cedarville, Mike DeWine took the oath of office to become the 64th person to serve as Ohio Governor.

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