opioid epidemic | WOSU Radio

opioid epidemic

State of Ohio / Governor's office

A report from 60 Minutes and the Washington Post on Sunday suggested Central Ohio-based Cardinal Health and other opioid painkiller distributors persuaded Congress to weaken the Drug Enforcement Agency’s authority.

On an afternoon in August at the Indiana State Library, a stately limestone building usually home to genealogy conventions or history lectures, the Indiana chapter of The National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, or NORML, laid out a very distinctive welcome mat emblazoned with a familiar leafy plant.


Washington Post

During a live-streamed conversation at The Washington Post, Ohio's U.S. Sen. Rob Portman discussed the possibility of President Trump declaring the opioid epidemic a national emergency.

U.S. Navy/John Page / Flickr

A Stark County company has come up with a glove that's resistant to fentanyl — one of the drugs that first responders have increasingly been exposed to when treating opioid overdose victims.

Seth Herald / Side Effects Public Media

Officer Ron Meyers drives down a dirt road in rural Ross County. As he passes each home, he slows down and squints, searching for an address. Out here the house numbers are written on the front of homes in marker, or in faded numbers clinging to old mailboxes. There’s no GPS.  

ZaldyImg / Flickr

The Mahoning Valley has been one of the hardest hit areas in the state by the ongoing opioid crisis. As local officials continue to struggle to find ways to reduce the number of fatal overdoses, one program being tried in other parts of Northeast Ohio may provide some relief.

Ohio State College of Social Work

Ohio State’s College of Social Work announced that it has received a $3 million grant to fight substance abuse in the state. 

A Gannett Newspapers reporter who was part of a team of journalists observing the opioid epidemic across Ohio in July  wrote this about paramedics in Newark near Columbus attempting to revive a man from an overdose:

“They’ve tried spraying naloxone into his nostrils, but it’s had no effect. He’s not breathing. They’re running out of time.

With the country in the throes of an epidemic, communities across the nation are being forced to confront the harrowing, and often fatal, effects of opioid abuse. But solutions — such as creating intervention programs in Ohio, providing access to treatment in Alabama, or investing in prevention initiatives in Missouri — cost money.

This story was co-published with The New York Times.

At a time when the United States is in the grip of an opioid epidemic, many insurers are limiting access to pain medications that carry a lower risk of addiction or dependence, even as they provide comparatively easy access to generic opioid medications.

The attorneys general of 41 U.S. states said Tuesday that they're banding together to investigate the makers and distributors of powerful opioid painkillers that have, over the past decade, led to a spike in opiate addictions and overdose deaths.

Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Overdose deaths continue to rise in Southwest Ohio, and the opioid epidemic is taking a toll on courts as more and more addicts end up behind bars for drug-related crimes. To help mitigate overcrowding, some Miami Valley counties are launching special drug courts.

The courts offer nonviolent addicts a chance to avoid jail and get the services they need to stay clean and out of trouble for good—but it’s no easy fix.

ideastream

The U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs, Dr. David Shulkin, joined President Trump’s opioid task force at the Cleveland VA Medical Center on Thursday.

Kyle Cook and Carla Saunders are neonatal nurse practitioners at a children's hospital in Knoxville, Tenn., where they've spent decades caring for infants. In the summer of 2010, their jobs began to change.

"We had six babies in the nursery who were in withdrawal," Saunders, 51, remembers.

The Cincinnati Enquirer sent reporters into the field for seven days to report on the heroin crisis. They returned with an alarming snapshot of a national epidemic.

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