Ohioans Against Corporate Bailouts | WOSU Radio

Ohioans Against Corporate Bailouts

Pention workers for the nuclear power plant bailout are collecting signatures throughout Ohio.
Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

Last week brought a close to one chapter for Ohio's nuclear power plant bailout, House Bill 6, when the group collecting signatures to fight against the law fell short of their goal.

A federal judge on Wednesday denied the group more time to collect enough signatures to trigger a ballot referendum, but activists are still hoping the Ohio Supreme Court will grant their request.

Perry Nuclear Power Plant in Perry, Ohio
Dan Konik / Ohio Public Radio

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown talk about the questionable, yet successful, efforts of nuclear energy interests to keep a referendum off the ballot. Catherine Turcer, the Executive Director for Common Cause Ohio, joins the show.

Ohioans Against Corporate Bailouts revealed in a U.S. District Court hearing that they fell far short of the signatures needed to qualify for a potential referendum on the nuclear bailout bill, created through HB6.

The entrance to FirstEnergy Corp.'s Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station in Oak Harbor, Ohio.
Ron Schwane / Associated Press

Opponents of the nuclear power plant bailout declined to submit signatures before the state-mandated deadline for their bid to get a referendum on the law on the 2020 ballot.

Petitioners are giving one last push into the drive that would put Ohio's nuclear bailout law before voters. The referendum effort must file enough valid signatures, 265,774, by Monday afternoon in order to qualify for next year's ballot. 

Pention workers for the nuclear power plant bailout are collecting signatures throughout Ohio.
Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

The group that wants to overturn Ohio’s nuclear power plant bailout law is required to submit nearly 266,000 valid signatures by next Monday to halt that law and put it before voters next year. However supporters of the bailout are waging an unrelenting fight to stop that.

UPDATE: A federal judge has ruled that opponents of the nuclear power plant bailout law can temporarily stop filing paperwork that discloses personal information about their signature gatherers. The group that wants to put the law before voters says the other side has been using that information to target their petition circulators.

Gov. Mike DeWine unveils 17-point plan to reduce gun violence.
Ohio Governor Office

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown talk about Gov. Mike DeWine's proposed gun laws. Depending on who you ask, DeWine's proposals either don't do enough or do too much. Ann Fisher, host of All Sides with Ann Fisher on 89.7 NPR News, joins the show.

Opponents of the nuclear power plant bailout, created through HB6, have filed a lawsuit in federal court to get an extension to their referendum signature gathering due date. Ohioans Against Corporate Bailouts is arguing their rivals are unfairly using campaign records against them.

The Ohio Attorney General is looking into allegations that a nuclear bailout group is trying to pay off petitioners and to buy the signatures they've gathered. 

A new group is joining the fray over Ohio's nuclear bailout law, HB6, by encouraging people who have already signed the HB6 referendum to take their names off the petition.

The entrance to FirstEnergy Corp.'s Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station in Oak Harbor, Ohio.
Ron Schwane / Associated Press

Dark money gets a lot of attention at the federal level, but it’s hard at work in Ohio right now.

The group fighting to protect the subsidies for FirstEnergy Solutions has been paying for mailers and ads that use anti-Chinese government rhetoric. 

Pention workers for the nuclear power plant bailout are collecting signatures throughout Ohio.
Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

Ballot efforts typically ramp up in the weeks before an election. The fight over Ohio’s new nuclear bailout law, though, is in full swing more than a year before a possible vote.

So why the early start? One side says it’s to keep two nuclear power plants from closing, while experts say spending now may be the best investment.

Andy Chow

The League of Women Voters and Common Cause Ohio are joining forces to call out the lack of transparency in the scathing campaign against the nuclear bailout referendum attempt.

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