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Ohio Senate

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Ohio Senate Republicans have made several big changes to a House bill, HB154, that would repeal and replace the process used to takeover failing schools. 

Mourners gather for a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

An Ohio Senate committee is holding hearings on several pieces of gun legislation on Tuesday. Some of the bills being heard in the Government Oversight and Reform Committee won the support of Republicans following last month’s Dayton mass shooting.

State senators are reintroducing a "Red Flag" bill with the support of Sen. Peggy Lehner (R-Kettering) who says she's no longer satisfied with the status quo.

Sam Hendren

A pair of Republican senators want to keep requiring Ohio vehicles to have front license plates. A new provision that drops that requirement goes into effect next year, so the lawmakers say they still have time to fight the change.

Paul Vernon / Associated Press

After 17 days of overtime budget negotiations, lawmakers in the Ohio House and Senate have reached a $69 billion two-year spending deal.

The entrance to FirstEnergy Corp.'s Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station in Oak Harbor, Ohio.
Ron Schwane / Associated Press

Environmental advocates say the Senate’s new energy plan is taking Ohio in the wrong direction when it comes to emerging energy sources and innovations. That plan would likely bail out two nuclear power plants through new charges on electric bills.

A new version of the comprehensive energy bill, HB6, was introduced in the Ohio Senate on Monday that would charge residential ratepayers $0.85 a month on their electric bills to bail out the state's two nuclear power plants.

Lt. Gov. Jon Husted at the Opportunity Zones Showcase in Columbus, where he unveiled the marketing platform for opportunity zones to share details on places and projects available for investment.
Karen Kasler / Statehouse News Bureau

Ohio has been operating under a temporary budget for a week and a half. But Lt. Gov. Jon Husted isn't too worried about the budget stalemate, which must be resolved by next week.

The Ohio Office of Budget Management is instructing state agency directors to keep a close watch on their spending during the 17-day budget extension.

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine, left, shakes hands with Ohio House speaker Larry Householder after delivering the Ohio State of the State address at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, Ohio, Tuesday, March 5, 2019.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

Ohio lawmakers failed to reach a state budget agreement by the midnight deadline, missing the mark for a spending deal for the new two-year cycle. Because the House and Senate couldn’t reach a compromise, both chambers passed a temporary budget extension to keep the government running. 

Senate Finance Chair Matt Dolan (R-Chagrin Falls) gestures during a discussion about the Ohio Senate version of the budget as President Larry Obhof (R-Medina) looks on.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

With hours to go before the deadline for a two-year operating budget to be signed, and negotiations stalled with the Ohio House, the Ohio Senate approved a deal that would extend it for 17 days.

Ohio Senate president Larry Obhof is defending income tax cuts in their version of the budget, which must be finalized by this weekend.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

It’s looking like the conference committee working on a compromise state budget will stretch into the weekend – with the budget-signing deadline approaching on Sunday night. Among the differences between the Ohio House and Senate versions is an income tax cut and a small business tax break. 

The William Green Building, home to the Bureau of Workers Compensation in downtown Columbus.
Daniel / Konik

The Senate has passed a $645 million budget for the Bureau of Workers’ Compensation, after stripping out sections added by the House on first responders and immigration.

solar panels
Pixabay

The Senate has made its own sweeping changes to Ohio energy policy through a substitute bill version of HB6 that continues to bailout nuclear power plants but avoids repealing renewable energy and energy efficiency standards.

Gov. Mike DeWine, center, speaks between Ohio Senate President Larry Obhof, left, and Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder during the Ohio State of the State address at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, Ohio, Tuesday, March 5, 2019.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

Ohio’s two-year state budget is headed to a conference committee this week to work out significant differences between the House and Senate versions. There isn’t much time to deal, because the budget must be signed by Sunday night.

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