Ohio Association of Foodbanks

The USDA has extended the summer food service program to allow schools that have been providing meals to low-income kids through the summer to continue to do so through the end of the calendar year. But not all kids getting school meals will benefit.

How COVID-19 Worsens Economic Hardships

Sep 2, 2020
Cook County Deputy Sheriff Scott Hunter posts the final eviction notice on an apartment in Evanston, Ill., Tuesday, March 17, 2009.
Charles Arbogast / AP

For those at the bottom rung of the economic ladder, COVID-19 has delivered a hard one-two punch.

Putting food on the table, making rent, avoiding eviction - those were day-to-day worries even before the pandemic.

In this March 24, 2020, file photo, members of The Ohio National Guard assist in repackaging emergency food boxes for food distribution at the Cleveland Food Bank in Cleveland.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, Ohio National Guard members have been helping food banks out with distribution. The Guard was supposed to end its mission this month, but now will continue to help in a reduced capacity.

A sign in the window of Trattoria Roma in Grandview on May 14, 2020.
David Holm / WOSU

A collection of health and human services advocates are urging Ohio leaders to immediately work on revamping the unemployment compensation system in order to avoid another backlog of claims.

Lisa Hamler-Fugitt, executive director of the Ohio Association of Food Banks (right), checks out the produce while she talks with employees at the Mid-Ohio Food Bank in Grove City, just south of Columbus.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Congress is considering a bill that would make it easier for low-income people to get emergency food assistance during the COVID-19 outbreak. Advocates for foodbanks are requesting the state and communities make some changes too.

A Columbus grocery store has some empty space in the paper products aisle. Some stores are reporting items selling out or shortages of some items, such as hand sanitizer.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

As the coronavirus spreads, people are being urged to prepare by stocking up on food and supplies, checking to see if they can work from home if schools and workplaces are shut down, and staying home if they’re sick. But these aren’t options for many lower-income people in Ohio.

SNAP benefits sign
USDAgov / Flickr Creative Commons

Leaders in the Ohio Senate had a last-minute change of heart on a bill, SB165, to require Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) cards to include a photo ID. It’s been tabled until the new year.

A Trump administration proposal would cut food stamps benefits to over 3 million people nationwide.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

About 3.1 million people would lose food stamp benefits under the Trump administration's proposal to tighten automatic eligibility requirements for the food stamp program.

Gov. John Kasich signed a bill this week increasing how often food assistance recipients must be certified for eligibility. The move is drawing fire from the state’s foodbanks.

Debbie Holmes

Under President Trump’s newly proposed budget, about 80 percent of SNAP recipients could lose about half of the credit that is currently put on their EBT cards, and would receive a box of food from the government instead. 

For years now, low-income people who visited Ohio’s foodbanks could also get help filling out the paperwork necessary to get health care through the federal Affordable Care Act’s Navigator program. Due to the Trump administration, that won’t be the case anymore.