nursing homes

Gov. Mike DeWine holds a coronavirus press conference on September 15, 2020.
Office of Gov. Mike DeWine

Ohio will begin allowing indoor visitation at nursing homes, long-term care centers and intermediate care facilities, months after closing their doors due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Jacqueline McFarquhar's mom, Beryline Hillaire, celebrating her 80th birthday at the adult day care center Active Day.
Courtesy of Jacqueline McFarquhar

Jacqueline McFarquhar’s mom, Beryline Hillaire, is 80 years old and has Alzheimer’s. For the last two years, Hillaire's been going to Active Day, an adult day care center near Cincinnati.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine
Office of Gov. Mike DeWine

Ohio saw the highest number of deaths from COVID-19 in a single day since May, Gov. Mike DeWine announced Tuesday.

Nursing home entrance
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

The state is pausing a widespread COVID-19 testing program at assisted living facilities due to what Gov. Mike DeWine called "inconsistent results" with the baseline saliva kits.

The state has entered into an agreement with a company to provide COVID-19 testing for every assisted living facility in the state. Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) says this marks an important step forward in stopping the spread of coronavirus in high-risk residential areas.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine gives a press conference from his home in Cedarville.
Office of Gov. Mike DeWine

Gov. Mike DeWine on Thurday set a reopening date of senior centers and adult day centers for September 21 and laid out several measures the facilities will have to follow.

Paige Pfleger / WOSU

A Franklin County nursing home has the largest number of cumulative COVID-19 cases of any long-term care facility in the state. That’s because it is one of several facilities voluntarily admitting COVID-19 patients.

A sign at the Mill Run nursing home in Hilliard.
Ryan Hitchcock / WOSU

Ohio’s nursing homes don’t have enough personal protective equipment to last another week, according to the federal agency that deals with Medicare and Medicaid services. 

Updated at 3 p.m. ET

Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden wants the United States to commit $775 billion to expand access for and lower the cost of caregiving.

The proposal, which Biden outlined in a speech Tuesday afternoon, would emphasize tax credits and state funding subsidies to make child care more affordable and accessible, and make prekindergarten for 3- and 4-year-olds universal.

No one has been more acutely affected by the pandemic than people who live in nursing homes and their families.

The state banned visitors four months ago as nursing home deaths spiked.

Today, outdoor visits are supposed to resume. But many facilities have told visitors it’s still not safe.

Mill Run Rehabilitation Center and Assisted Living in Hilliard has seen several residents and staff test positive for COVID-19.
Ryan Hitchcock / WOSU

Gov. Mike DeWine says a new public health order may be coming to help nursing homes, where more than 2,100 cases have been reported, as well as three-quarters of all confirmed COVID-19 deaths in Ohio.

The nation’s nursing homes lobbying group has written to Ohio’s Mike DeWine and other governors, warning that without action now there will be more outbreaks, especially if visitors are allowed back in to see loved ones after months away.

Nearly three quarters of all confirmed COVID-19 deaths in Ohio have been in nursing homes. Ohio National Guard personnel have been helping with testing in long term care facilities, but the funding for them to continue that and other pandemic related missions runs out in a month.

Gov. Mike DeWine at his daily coronavirus press conference on Sunday, March 23, 2020.
Office of Gov. Mike DeWine

Gov. Mike DeWine announced that Ohio's nursing homes will be allowed to have outdoor visitors again, beginning July 20. It will be the first time in four months that many long-term care residents will be able to see family members in person.

One of the hardest things during this pandemic — for kids and adult children — has been staying away from their parents and grandparents.

People 65 years and older are at higher risk for getting a severe case of COVID-19, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And about 80% of deaths in the U.S. from COVID-19 have been in people older than 65.

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