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J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

Gov. Mike DeWine has rolled out a 17 point plan to address gun violence in the wake of a mass shooting in Dayton. Legislative leaders are already warning proposals like new background checks and a so-called "red flag law" could be a tough sell with their members.

As part of our Curious Cbus series about guns in Ohio, several listeners wanted to know how much the NRA—and other gun groups—donate to Ohio lawmakers.

How you are judged as an elected official has much more to do with how you respond in the worst of times than in the best of times.

Ohio's Republican governor, veteran politician Mike DeWine, is finding that out right now.

The National Rifle Association's sway in the nation's capital may be waning at a time when two mass shootings in Ohio and Texas are reigniting the debate about enacting new gun restrictions.

In the past few months, the gun rights group's president stepped aside; its top lobbyist resigned; and allegations of financial misconduct at the highest levels of the group have burst into the open.

The goal of the National African American Gun Association is to introduce black Americans to guns and also instruct them on how to use them.

Some see the group as an alternative to the National Rifle Association for black gun owners, but it has some notable differences. Organizers say it is a civil rights organization that aims to build community and promote self-protection.

Since its creation in 2015, the group has seen rapid growth with roughly 30,000 members and 75 chapters nationwide. Leaders expect another 25 chapters by next year.

The National Rifle Association has shut down its online TV channel and lost its chief lobbyist, new setbacks for a group that also is the subject of another congressional investigation, NPR has learned.

The NRA has struggled under both scrutiny from the outside for its connections to Russia's interference in American politics and from internal divisions over its leadership and its finances.

Updated at 6:01 p.m. ET

National Rifle Association leader Oliver North announced Saturday that he will not seek a second term as president of the gun rights group, as is customary.

The decision plunged the organization into chaos ahead of a board meeting on Monday and sparked debate among NRA members over a resolution on whether to oust Chief Executive Wayne LaPierre.

Updated at 12:49 p.m. ET

The House of Representatives approved legislation renewing the Violence Against Women Act with new provisions that restrict gun ownership and expand transgender rights.

The National Rifle Association opposed the bill — putting GOP lawmakers in a tough position of voting against a measure protecting victims of domestic and sexual violence or opposing the politically powerful gun lobby.

The vote was 263 to 158, with 33 Republicans joining all but one Democrat to pass the measure. One GOP member voted present.

Physicians across the country have a message for the National Rifle Association: Gun violence is our concern. It's part of a battle being fought vigorously on Twitter in recent weeks.

Editor's note: This story includes graphic imagery and language.

A mocking tweet from the National Rifle Association has stirred many physicians to post on social media about their tragically frequent experiences treating patients in the aftermath of gun violence.

Click here if you don't see the video player in this story.

Updated at 5:24 p.m. ET

President Trump and Vice President Pence spoke to the National Rifle Association at the organization's annual meeting in Dallas on Friday — renewing a political partnership that was briefly tested by the deadly school shooting in Parkland, Fla.

Updated at 9:05 a.m. ET

Victims of the Parkland, Fla., high school shooting and their parents are criticizing the National Rifle Association after it announced that gun advocates won't be allowed to bring weapons to watch Vice President Pence deliver the NRA-Institute for Legislative Action's leadership forum keynote address in Dallas on Friday.

The NRA says the ban was ordered by the U.S. Secret Service.

The growing momentum for tighter gun control after the deadly school shooting in Parkland, Fla., is highlighting the National Rifle Association's history of aggressively confronting challenges to what it regards as Second Amendment rights.

Federal limits on both research into gun violence and the release of data about guns used in crimes are powerful reminders of the lobbying group's advantages over gun control activists. For decades, the NRA pushed legislation that stifled the study and spread of information about the causes of gun violence.

Rep. Tim Ryan
WKSU

Northeast Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan says he’s not hopeful that Congress will make meaningful changes in gun laws, but has more faith that actions by private business will bring about reforms.

Updated at 3:37 p.m. ET

During a gathering with governors at the White House, President Trump called for strengthening school defenses and improving the "early warning" system in response to this month's deadly school shooting in Parkland, Fla.

"Our nation is heartbroken," Trump said. "We'll turn our grief into action."

Protesters demonstrated at U.S. Sen. Rob Portman's (R-OH) Columbus office Thursday.
Nick Evans

Wednesday's school shooting in Parkland, Fla., which killed 17 people and injured several others, is putting unwelcome pressure on Ohio’s junior Senator.  Republican Sen. Rob Portman is among the top 10 recipients of National Rifle Association campaign contributions in the country.

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