new music

Composer Ching-chu Hu
Denison University

That moment when you’re facing something that might be wonderful or harrowing...

You inhale. You pause. You exhale.

That moment, suspended in time and tied so closely to our emotions that the breath pauses automatically, is what Ching-chu Hu, professor of music composition and chair of the Music Department at Denison University, calls “the hope moment.”

color photo of the Quaternaglia Guitar Quartet holding their guitars
Gal Oppido / Courtesy of the Quaternaglia Guitar Quartet

Here in America, we love our guitar heroes. Name any one of them – Hendrix, Prince, Santana, Van Halen – and memories of monster riffs start rolling in.

But imagine having Hendrix, Prince, Santana and Van Halen all in the same room together.

Now, that’s some virtuoso mojo.

Recently, Brazil’s Quaternaglia Guitar Quartet filled the Classical 101 studio with its own brand of São Paulo-style virtuosity.

color photo of Miwa Matreyek performing in one of her animations
Miwa Matreyek / YouTube/Courtesy of Miwa Matreyek

Teamwork is the name of the game at Denison University’s TUTTI New Music Festival this year.

Musicians and athletes will explore together the key ingredients of working successfully in teams during TUTTI Festival 2020, March 3-7 on Denison’s Granville campus.

color photo of the members of Bearthoven sitting on a couch
Jaime Boddorff / Courtesy of Bearthoven

Judging by their instruments – piano, bass and drums – you might think they’re a standard jazz trio. But there’s nothing standard about the contemporary music trio Bearthoven.

Based in Brooklyn, Bearthoven has been making a name during the last seven years as an impassioned catalyst for the creation of new music. The trio returns to Columbus this month to give the world premiere of Mixed Tulips by Michael Gordon, composer and co-founder of the Brooklyn-based new music collective Bang on a Can and the Bang on a Can Summer Music Festival at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art.

Percussionist Colleen Bernstein performs in the WOSU studios.
Nick Houser / WOSU

Sometimes a snare drum is not just a snare drum.

Percussion soloists Cameron Leach and Colleen Bernstein took the drummer’s humble rat-a-tat-tats into the world of scat singing, hand drumming and other unexpected feats on a recent visit to the Classical 101 studio.

color photo of Derek Bermel holding a pencil and sitting with a musical score
publicity photo / courtesy of Derek Bermel

It was a fateful trip to the art museum.

That trip decades ago, when Derek Bermel was just a kid - long before he became an award-winning composer and clarinetist -  that has landed Bermel on the list of Grammy Award nominees.

color photo of Lindsey Goodman playing her flute
Nick Houser / WOSU Public Media

Columbus flutist Lindsey Goodman’s most recent solo recording ETEREO (Navona Records) is interesting in any number of ways. But Goodman says her favorite thing about the disc is that she recorded it in Weigel Hall Auditorium, right here in Columbus.

color photo of Caroline Shaw
Kait Moreno / carolineshaw.com

Six years ago, fifty bucks and an outside-the-box choir helped Caroline Shaw become the youngest person to win the Pulitzer Prize for music. Here's a look at some of what she's been doing more recently.

color photo of Chamber Brews in performance
publicity photo/Chamber Brews / https://www.chamberbrews.com/about-1

Question: How can music by women composers be performed on more concerts?

Answer: Perform it.

That’s what the Columbus-based string quartet Chamber Brews is doing. And they're joining a growing number of professional ensembles in their quest to showcase music by composers who, by virtue of their sex, their race and/or their socioeconomic background, have traditionally been underrepresented on  classical music concerts.

black-and-white photo of Caroline Shaw performing with the Calder Quartet
Music on Main / youtube

Just a few more weary days and then, I’ll fly away.

Albert E. Brumley had no idea the song would become so popular, would resonate so boldly with people’s spirits or, much later, would inspire a Pulitzer Prize-winning composer to give it a stunning arrangement.

He also had no idea his song might end up joining your Thanksgiving festivities.

color photo of Matt Haimovitz playing the cello on the roof of an urban building
Brent Calis / Oxingale Records

You could say Matt Haimovitz does things differently.

He abandoned the typical career of a classical cellist early on. Since then, Haimovitz, now on the faculty of McGill University's Schulich School of Music, has championed new music and sought out unusual venues in which to perform it.

photo of Antoine Clark conducting the McConnell Arts Center Chamber Orchestra
Ronald Hoehn / antoinetclark.com

Columbus conductor and clarinetist Antoine Clark wants women musicians and musicians of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds to be heard.

color photo of Jory Vinikour sitting at the harpsichord
Nuccio di Nuzzo / http://joryvinikour.com/presenters.shtml

You might think the harpsichord is a mere historic novelty, an outdated baroque cousin of the piano and fit only for the powdered wig set. If so, the American harpsichordist Jory Vinikour’s most recent recording might change your mind.

color photo of Wil B. and Kev Marcus playing their instruments
Black Violin / https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WYerKidQGcc

They’ve spent the last 15 years breaking stereotypes with their genre-busting songs and instrumentals. Now, Black Violin is adding a heavy dose of full-out inspiration to the mix.

color photo of rehearsal
Broad Street Presbyterian Church / William Boggs/Broad Street Presbyterian Church

Your beautiful infant child is diagnosed with cancer.

Months – even years – of doctor’s visits, tests, surgeries and medical treatments, like everything else in life, offer no guarantees. And even if the illness is brought under control, it still hangs over your family like the sword of Damocles.

It’s every parent’s nightmare. And Brittany and the Rev. Trip Porch, of Granville, have been living this nightmare ever since their son, Ward, was diagnosed with Wilms Tumor, a rare form of kidney cancer, nearly two years ago.

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