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In a move that critics say will hurt plants, animals and other species as they face mounting threats, the Trump administration is making major changes to how the Endangered Species Act is implemented. The U.S. Department of Interior on Monday announced a suite of long-anticipated revisions to the nation's premier wildlife conservation law, which is credited with bringing back the bald eagle and grizzly bears, among other species.

A new hybrid bird species has been spotted around parks in northeast Ohio.

The bird is a type of warbler resulting from mating between Cerulean Warblers and Northern Parulas.

Park Ranger Ryan Trimbath was the first to spot the bird in 2014 while he was working for the Summit Metro Parks in Deep Lock Quarry.

He says the experience has opened his mind to when people claim to see new species.

Viktoriia Radchuk, an evolutionary ecologist at Berlin's Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, wanted to know how animals were responding to climate change.

So she scoured the results of more than 10,000 animal studies — on species from frogs to snakes, from insects to birds to mammals — looking for information on how changing environments were affecting animal behavior. Based on the available data, she decided to focus on birds in the Northern Hemisphere.

Updated at 5:45 p.m. ET

Three summers ago, Ayse Tenger-Trolander, a graduate student at the University of Chicago, ordered a batch of monarch butterflies from a breeder, and made an accidental discovery: the butterflies had likely lost the ability to migrate.

Birding Along The Cuyahoga River

May 17, 2019

It’s prime time for birding in Northeast Ohio as many species have arrived from warmer winter spots.

ideastream visited two very different places for bird watching along the Cuyahoga River as part of its series, Cuyahoga River Comeback, commemorating the 50th anniversary of the infamous fire on the water.

One lesser-known place to visit is Eldon Russell Park in Geauga County, tucked away near the edge of Burton and Troy Township. Once there, launch a kayak or canoe on the Cuyahoga River and cruise for birds.

Up to 1 million of the estimated 8 million plant and animal species on Earth are at risk of extinction — many of them within decades — according to scientists and researchers who produced a sweeping U.N. report on how humanity's burgeoning growth is putting the world's biodiversity at perilous risk.

Spring Migration And Birding

Mar 26, 2019
White-throated sparrow
MIKE'S BIRDS / Flickr

A report published late last year found that global temperatures are nearing dire levels, affecting the habitat and the wellbeing of humans and wildlife alike.

Birds often are affected first. 

Coming up on All Sides, the spring migration ahead and how a changing climate may affect America’s favorite pastime of birding. 

pigeons
Couleur / Pixabay

When you visit large cities like San Francisco, Chicago or New York, pigeons are a common sight. You’ll find them nesting on window sills, walking on sidewalks and congregating in public parks.

If you don’t see them in person, the evidence of pigeons will be obvious in the droppings they leave behind, covering once-dignified statues and monuments.

Take A Visual Vacation Inside Oberlin's Massive Flower Factory

Mar 19, 2019

This week brings the first week of spring, time we hope, to put away those snow shovels and dust off the garden tools. But while we wait for the first blooms outside, let's take you inside one of the largest greenhouses in the United States – for a visual vacation and some spring stimulation.

As ideastream producers Mary Fecteau and Stephanie Jarvis discover, engineering the perfect plant – indoors or out – involves far more than a seed and soil.

Orchid Overload

Bald eagles were once almost wiped out of Ohio. Now, the state has more than 220 nesting pairs.
Jim Kaftan

A freight train chugs across a bridge high above as Cleveland Metroparks historian Karen Lakus begins a tour of what she calls the hidden valley. Not long ago, she says, this was a dump.

“It was trash and gravel, and it was completely overgrown,” she says.

Coyotes In Ohio

Jan 17, 2019
Julie Zickefoose

Coyotes first arrived in Ohio in 1919, migrating primarily from the west but also the north and east.

But not all coyotes are created equal. Increasingly they are hybrid versions made up of coyote, wolf and dog. And that hybridization has invigorated the species.

We catch up on the coyotes of Ohio today with naturalist, author and artist Julie Zickefoose.

Coming up on All Sides, the coyote in Ohio’s backyard.

​Guests: 

Once the traditional holidays of Black Friday and Cyber Monday are over, some Americans look forward to another tradition: the annual Christmas Bird Count.  

Since 1900 birders have picked one day — sometime around Christmas — to survey as many birds as they can find in a 15 mile diameter circle.  

Birder Mike Edgerton, a member of the Greater Akron Audubon Society, says it’s been a valuable form of crowd sourcing.

Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Walking through Creekside Park, tucked between downtown Gahanna and Big Walnut Creek, I just see a bunch of trees – at first.

A federal judge has restored Endangered Species Act protections for grizzly bears living around Yellowstone National Park.

In his ruling, U.S. District Court Judge Dana Christensen said the federal government didn't use the best available science when it removed the bears from the threatened-species list last year.

Monday's ruling puts a stop to proposed grizzly hunts in Wyoming and Idaho, which were on hold while Christensen mulled his decision.

We Ohioans live among bears.

So, too, do Kentuckians, but it's not such a big deal on their side of the river because they've gotten used to it.

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