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Natural Gas

Secretary Of State: Counties Can't Vote To Ban "Fracking"

Aug 14, 2015
Flickr.com

Ohio's elections chief has moved to invalidate ballot proposals in three counties related to the oil- and gas-drilling technique of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking.

Senate Budget Could Be Kasich's Best Shot At Severance Tax Hike

Jun 2, 2015
Oil well
Flickr / Creative Commons

The Ohio Senate plans on releasing a revised budget any day now, and it might include an increase to the state tax on freshly-drilled oil and natural gas. And the Senate budget could be Governor John Kasich’s best shot so far at increasing the severance tax.

Flickr

Some state lawmakers want to make it easier for Ohioans to buy cars that run on compressed natural gas, or CNG.

Many bills were left on the cutting room floor at the end of last year as the lame duck session came to a close. That includes a provision from Representatives Sean O’Brien—a Democrat—and Dave Hall—a Republican.

The bill would give tax incentives for people who wanted to buy a CNG car or convert their current vehicle to run on CNG. O’Brien says this would be a great way to capitalize of the natural gas development happening in eastern Ohio.

Fracking Expansion in Ohio

Jul 8, 2014

10:00

Natural gas production in Ohio nearly doubled between 2012 and 2013. Proponents of fracking say it's a plentiful and cheap energy source, but some worry about its links to fish kills, earthquakes, and poor water quality. This hour, we'll examine the expansion of fracking in Ohio, and its possible economic and public health consequences.

Guests

Chesapeake Energy reported there is about $20 billion worth of oil and natural gas reserves under eastern Ohio. Governor Kasich sees this as an opportunity to lead Ohio to an economic revolution... as long as a few issues are addressed. Could Ohio be the model on how to “get things right?â€? This hour we’ll talk about the potential boons and burdens of fracking in Ohio... Next on All Sides with Ann Fisher, right after the news, on 89-seven, NPR News. Guests:

Controversy surrounding oil industry use of hydraulic fracturing to capture natural gas with Greenwire reporter Mike Soraghan, Energy in Depth executive director Lee Fuller and retired environmental engineer Weston Wilson. Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) regulation of indecent language on broadcast television and radio, with Mortiz College of Law professor Christopher Fairman.

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