Native Americans

The Cultural Significance Of Ohio Archaeological Sites

Apr 29, 2019
Courtesy of Ohio History Connection

The fire at Notre Dame this month shook the Western world, with billionaires pledging millions of dollars towards its restoration. 

The 13th century cathedral is an important cultural, historical, and religious symbol of Western Civilization.

Back in Ohio, however, culturally rich archaeological sites dating back more than a thousand years before Notre Dame are legally bulldozed. 

Today on All Sides, a closer look at Ohio’s ancient structures, who built them and how they shape the cultural identity of the state. 

The Greater Cincinnati Native American Coalition was a last-minute addition to the city's Martin Luther King Day Celebration. Members of the group prayed and sang in their native language Monday. They may be planning a march for later this week.

Updated: Sunday, 8:32 p.m.

Students from a northern Kentucky high school are under fire after video of an interaction with an indigenous person near the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., Friday went viral on social media. It shows an older man singing and playing a drum as a young man stares at him.

Just over half of Native Americans living on American Indian reservations or other tribal lands with a computer have access to high-speed Internet service, according to new estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau.

The low rate of subscription to a high-speed Internet service — 53 percent — in these often rugged, rural areas underscores the depth of the digital divide between Indian Country and the rest of the U.S. Between 2013 and 2017, 82 percent of households nationally with a computer reported having a subscription to a broadband Internet service.

Updated Friday, Nov. 16 at 11:40 a.m. ET

It sounds like a simple question for a police department. How many Native American women have gone missing or been murdered in a given city? In Seattle, say. Or Albuquerque. Or Salt Lake City. Or Baltimore.

Akron Public Schools is saying farewell to a 30-year-old wooden Native American statue. Chief Rotaynah will be removed from its home near Judith A. Resnik Community Learning Center after sustaining damage from weather and pests.

Each year, Dylan Jennings harvests wild rice from the lakes and rivers near his home in northern Wisconsin. He and a partner use a canoe, nosing carefully through rice beds and knocking rice kernels into the boat's hull using special sticks.

"It's a really long process," he says. "It starts with identifying the area where you are going to go ricing and knowing those areas in a very intimate way."

Native American leaders are once again pushing for a seat at the decision-making table, saying this week that tribal nations have been overlooked for "too often and too long."

Their latest concern comes with President Trump's proposed infrastructure plan. The president sent it to Congress on Monday, saying he aimed "to help build a better future for all Americans."

Cleveland Indians To Remove Chief Wahoo

Feb 1, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

The Cleveland Indians have announced they will be removing Chief Wahoo, their controversial logo, from their uniforms beginning in 2019. The logo has been the target of scrutiny for decades, primarily from Native Americans who believe it to be racist.  Others believe the logo isn't offensive at all.

We take a look at why the change is happening, and we'll hear from critics and supporters of the removal.

Elizabeth Miller / Great Lakes Today

At the Six Nations of the Grand River reserve, about 10 men are gathered in a classroom in the Haudenosaunee community center. The older men are teaching about traditions – on this day, a funeral ritual. But soon, Leroy Hill shifts the conversation to a new topic: water.

Library of Congress

This story is part of the Curious Cbus project. You ask the questions, you vote for one of the questions and we answer.

Listener Conor Morris must have reached the end of his rope when he asked WOSU, “Why are there so many god dang townships in Ohio named ‘Paint’?"

A group that supports the Serpent Mound historical site in Adams County is upset with the decision to cancel a popular Winter Solstice event.

Updated at 9:30 p.m. ET

On a visit to Utah on Monday, President Trump announced his proclamations dramatically shrinking the size of the state's two massive national monuments, Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante. Taken together, Trump's orders mark the largest reversal of national monument protections in U.S. history.

The change has already been challenged in court by conservation groups.

All countries have national myths. The story of the first Thanksgiving, for example, evokes the warm glow of intercultural contact: European settlers, struggling to survive in the New World, and Native American tribes eager to help. But as many of us learned in history class, this story leaves a lot out.

Updated Saturday at 9:10 p.m. ET

One morning earlier this year, Northern Arapaho member Rose was sitting at the table with her 14-year-old daughter, Latoya.

"I told her to move her hair because she had her hair like this," said Rose, showing how Latoya pulled her hair over to hide her neck and cheek. "Because I noticed something ... she had marks, hickeys, just completely covering her, even almost on her face."

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