national parks

Updated at 5:50 p.m. ET

More than two years after carrying out the largest reversal of national monument protections in U.S. history, the Trump administration has finalized plans for the roughly 2 million acres of formerly protected land in southern Utah.

Electric assisted bicycles, or e-bikes, are becoming more and more popular across the United States. Throughout the country's national parks, that could be a good and a bad thing.

It can be tough to distinguish an e-bike from a regular road or mountain bike by sight, but once you start pedaling, you sure feel the difference.

It's been more than a year since golfers teed off at the former Brandywine Country Club. But the next visitors might be wearing hiking boots instead of golf shoes.

The Conservancy for Cuyahoga Valley National Park signed an agreement to buy the site Thursday. 

Conservancy CEO Deb Yandala says the park has been interested in the land for quite awhile, in part because the parcel sits in the middle of the park.

Riders can now bring electric bicycles into Cuyahoga Valley National Park as part of a change in nationwide policy by the U.S. Park Service.

Rob Wallace, Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks at the US. Interior Department formally announced the change during a short ceremony at CVNP on Thursday. 

“E-bikes have been appearing in national parks with more frequency, but until now, there has been no regulation that directly addressed their use,” he said.

color photo of Frank Lee Ruggles
Don Mears / frankleeruggles.photoshelter.com

Two and a half years ago, two people with strong ties to Delaware, Ohio, met each other when they were being inducted into the Delaware City Schools’ Hall of Fame.

The National Park Service is expanding its presence at the First Ladies National Historic Site in Canton. The site had been closed during the government shutdown but will reopen on Friday.

In an unprecedented move, the National Park Service has decided to dip into entrance fee funds to pay for expanded operations during a government shutdown that has furloughed many of its workers.

The decision comes after reports of degradation in the parks — trash thrown on the ground, human waste piling up, and visitors behaving irresponsibly by letting their dogs off leash or even driving off-road to do donuts in the desert.

Everett Road Covered Bridge at the Cuyahoga Valley National Park in Summit County.
National Park Service

The William Howard Taft National Historic Site was closed as usual on New Year's Day, but the doors weren't unlocked Wednesday morning. Callers heard the following message: "Due to the lack in federal appropriation, William Howard Taft National Historic Site is closed."

Environmental advocates say time is running out to save a federal fund that helps improve local parks, pools, and playgrounds. 

Ohio’s Republican Senator, Rob Portman, was in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park over the weekend to highlight some of the maintenance that could be addressed by a bill before the Senate.

Nick Evans / WOSU

Bret Ruby trudges up a slight rise at the Hopeton Earthworks, one of six sites that make up the Hopewell Culture National Historical Park. Ruby serves as Hopewell’s archaeologist, and he wears the dark green uniform and flat brimmed hat of the National Park Service.

The Interior Department is abandoning a plan to more than double entrance fees to some of the country's most popular national parks, opting instead to apply a "modest" fee increase to 117 parks beginning this summer in an effort to raise funds for park maintenance.

The announcement Thursday comes after an outcry from the public and from lawmakers, who were concerned that certain large increases that were initially proposed would price people out of the nation's parks.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

Nearly all of the seats on the U.S. National Park Service advisory board are vacant following a mass resignation Monday night, with ex-members citing Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke's unwillingness to meet with them.

The Future of America's National Monuments

Dec 7, 2017
US Bureau of Land Management

President Trump announced the decision to shrink the Bears Ears, a sacred tribal site in Utah, and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments by more than 1.1 million acres and more than 800,000 acres, respectively. Today we examine the decision, its impact, and what that means for the future of national monuments in the United States in the Trump Era and beyond.

President Trump has dramatically scaled back two national land monuments in Utah. The administration and Republican leaders in Utah say taking the land out of the hands of the federal government will allow the state to decide what to do with it, including protecting some areas and possibly allowing development in others.

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