Nan Whaley | WOSU Radio

Nan Whaley

Tensions were high at the site of the Oregon District shooting Wednesday morning, where a crowd of about 150 people waited for President Donald Trump’s arrival in Dayton.

Screaming matches broke out just steps away from flowers memorializing the nine people who were killed by a lone gunman Sunday.

Police, occupied by the president’s visit to a nearby hospital, were initially not at the scene.

Before officers arrived to calm the melee, City Commissioner Chris Shaw tried to de-escalate the conflict on his own by standing between the two groups.

President Donald Trump is expected to visit Dayton Wednesday to meet with city officials and first responders, shooting survivors and victims’ families.

Few details about the visit have been released. But news of the president’s trip has already sparked protest in the city where a mass shooting over the weekend left nine people dead and more than two dozen others injured.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley has told reporters she anticipates protest, calling President Trump’s rhetoric “painful” for some here.

Mourners gather for a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Thousands of people gathered Sunday night in Dayton’s Oregon District to honor those killed by a gunman early Sunday morning in front of Ned Peppers bar.

This is a developing story that will be updated.

UPDATE 5:02 PM

Police are continuing to investigate a mass shooting in Dayton’s Oregon district overnight. 9 people were killed and 27 others were injured when a 24-year-old Bellbrook man opened fire outside Ned Peppers bar.

Police say the gunman drove downtown with his sister, who was later killed in the shooting. He wore body armour, ear protection, and a mask. He carried out the attack with an assault rifle that was purchased online.

U.S. Mayors Pick Columbus For 2022 Annual Meeting

Jul 22, 2019
Columbus skyline
Flickr

Columbus will be hosting a major gathering of U.S. mayors for the first time.

The 10 Ohio counties impacted by the Memorial Day tornado outbreak are now eligible for federal disaster recovery aid. Dayton-area officials say the FEMA and other funding could play a crucial role in the Miami Valley’s ongoing recovery.

President Donald Trump issued a federal disaster declaration Tuesday, one week after Gov. Mike DeWine formally requested it.

The declaration means affected Ohioans are now eligible for aid through FEMA’s individual assistance, hazard mitigation, and disaster legal services programs.

Dayton, hard hit by the opioid crisis, is battling back. The latest help comes from a Google Alphabet company called Verily, which is piloting an addiction treatment program it may scale nationwide.

United States Sen. Sherrod Brown is requesting federal funds to help Dayton recover some of the city's costs associated with security for the May 25 Klan rally. In a letter to the U.S. Department of Justice, Brown wrote the city spent more than $650,000 to ensure the safety and security of people and property during, "the potentially volatile event.”

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley says that while the city did not ask Brown to make the request, she's thankful for the help.

My hometown – Dayton, Ohio – deserves credit for a lot of things over the years: powered flight, the cash register, Huffy Bicycles, the pop-top soda can and hundreds of other inventions.

But Dayton and its surrounding communities rarely get the credit they deserve.

Cleanup continues again today after Monday’s massive tornado outbreak across Indiana and Ohio. The storms killed at least one person and injured dozens more across the Miami Valley. Gov. Mike DeWine has declared a state of emergency for three counties: Montgomery, Greene and Mercer.

Celina, in Mercer County, was particularly hard hit. Jakob Wenning lives there. He says he saw the roof of his apartment lift during the tornado.

Late Tuesday, Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley issued a statement commenting on the indictments and arrests of former city commissioner Joey Williams, two other public officials and a Dayton-area business owner. U.S. Department of Justice and FBI officials handed down the indictments alleging public corruption and fraud in Dayton, and city commissioners are following suit with their own comments.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley is vowing to fight a provision in the new two-year state transportation budget that would penalize cities for the use of red-light traffic cameras. Republican Gov. Mike DeWine Wednesday signed the bill, which also raises Ohio’s gas tax to fund road and bridge infrastructure repairs.

The transportation budget requires cities that operate red-light cameras to report any fines the cameras generate, and for the state to deduct that income from their state aid allocations.

The city reported roughly $1.9 million in revenue from its camera program 2018.

There are sticking points in the debate over the transportation budget beyond how much to raise the gas tax. One of them is whether the state should impose new rules on communities using traffic cameras.

In this Saturday, April 23, 2016 photo, members of the Ku Klux Klan participate in a "white pride" rally in Rome, Ga.
John Bazemore / Associated Press

Rep. Mike Turner (R-Dayton) is advising Dayton officials not to hold any counter-protests when a KKK-affiliated group assembles on Courthouse Square on May 25.

In this Saturday, April 23, 2016 photo, members of the Ku Klux Klan participate in a "white pride" rally in Rome, Ga.
John Bazemore / Associated Press

The city of Dayton has filed a lawsuit against an Indiana group that plans to hold a rally on Dayton’s Courthouse Square in May. City officials say the Honorable Sacred Knights is a paramilitary group and the rally they are planning is in violation of Ohio’s constitution.

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