Nan Whaley | WOSU Radio

Nan Whaley

Several state and local elected officials Friday launched a new yard-sign campaign advocating for stronger Ohio gun laws.

Joining Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley at a press conference in Dayton’s Oregon District were Montgomery County Auditor Karl Keith, State Sen. Peggy Lehner and representatives from the advocacy group Ohioans for Gun Safety.

Whaley announced the “Do Something” campaign outside the Trolley Stop tavern on Fifth St.

Gun Control In Ohio

Oct 9, 2019

Governor Mike DeWine in August -- and just days after a mass shooting in Dayton -- proposed the outline of a plan for mandatory background checks on private gun sales and a version of the so-called “red flag” law. On Monday, DeWine retreated from both proposals.

Instead, he proposed expanding the state’s “pink slip” system that hospitalizes people who are mentally ill for up to three days. And he proposed a plan to make it easier to prosecute the gun sellers.

Today on All Sides with Ann Fisher: the DeWine plan to address gun violence.

Guests:

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley is reacting to Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed changes to state gun laws. The governor unveiled details of his so-called STRONG Ohio bill Monday afternoon in Columbus.

Among the bill's proposed changes are voluntary measures allowing private gun buyers and sellers to request proof of background checks. The proposal would also expand the criteria used to keep guns out of the hands of people who pose a danger to themselves or others. 

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley testified on Capitol Hill Wednesday in support of stricter gun controls.

Speaking before a House Judiciary Committee Hearing on Assault Weapons, Whaley called on lawmakers to take assault weapons off the streets to stop shootings similar to the one in the city’s Oregon District that left nine people dead and nearly three dozen others injured.

Dayton, Ohio, Mayor Nan Whaley speaks to members of the media Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2019, outside Ned Peppers bar in the Oregon District after a mass shooting that occurred early Sunday morning in Dayton
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Leaders of the U.S. Conference of Mayors come to Columbus on Tuesday to lobby the federal government to pass gun control measures.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley joined a group of Congressional Democrats in Washington Monday to lobby for tighter gun regulations. The group that included Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer is calling for passage of a bill to expand background checks for gun purchases.

The bipartisan proposal known as H.R.8 would expand background checks to cover private firearm sales.

Mayor Whaley urged the Senate to bring the House bill to a vote.

Mayors are actively lobbying state lawmakers to consider a package of changes to gun laws and mental health policy unveiled by Gov. Mike DeWine in the wake of the Dayton mass shooting earlier this month.

Thousands of people were in downtown Dayton Sunday for comedian Dave Chappelle's Gem City Shine benefit show. 

The last thing that Nan Whaley, the Democratic mayor of Dayton, wants to hear in the wake of the tragedy that rocked her city on the early morning of Aug. 4 is the usual partisan bickering and excuses by politicians who are in the pocket of special interests.

She doesn't want to hear it.

Dayton, Ohio, Mayor Nan Whaley speaks to members of the media Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2019, outside Ned Peppers bar in the Oregon District after a mass shooting that occurred early Sunday morning in Dayton
John Minchillo / Associated Press

The mayor of Dayton says around-the-clock security detail was assigned to her because of hate-filled messages she received following verbal sparring with President Donald Trump. Trump visied a Dayton hospital earlier this month after nine people were slain in a mass shooting.

How you are judged as an elected official has much more to do with how you respond in the worst of times than in the best of times.

Ohio's Republican governor, veteran politician Mike DeWine, is finding that out right now.

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine says he’s moving forward with efforts to tighten gun regulations in the state. 

The Republican appeared in Dayton Thursday with Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley in the Oregon District.

Speaking near the site of a makeshift memorial to the nine people killed, and more than 30 others injured in Sunday’s shooting outside Ned Peppers Bar, Whaley told reporters she's focusing on helping her grieving city heal, and assisting Oregon District shop owners return to business as usual.  

Dayton Mayor Joins Letter Urging U.S. Senate To Return For Gun Bill Vote

Aug 8, 2019
Dayton, Ohio, Mayor Nan Whaley speaks to members of the media Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2019, outside Ned Peppers bar in the Oregon District after a mass shooting that occurred early Sunday morning in Dayton
John Minchillo / Associated Press

More than 200 mayors, including two anguished by mass shootings in Texas and Ohio, are urging the Senate to return to the Capitol to act on gun safety legislation amid criticism that Congress is failing to respond to back-to-back shootings that left 31 people dead.

Tensions were high at the site of the Oregon District shooting Wednesday morning, where a crowd of about 150 people waited for President Donald Trump’s arrival in Dayton.

Screaming matches broke out just steps away from flowers memorializing the nine people who were killed by a lone gunman Sunday.

Police, occupied by the president’s visit to a nearby hospital, were initially not at the scene.

Before officers arrived to calm the melee, City Commissioner Chris Shaw tried to de-escalate the conflict on his own by standing between the two groups.

President Donald Trump is expected to visit Dayton Wednesday to meet with city officials and first responders, shooting survivors and victims’ families.

Few details about the visit have been released. But news of the president’s trip has already sparked protest in the city where a mass shooting over the weekend left nine people dead and more than two dozen others injured.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley has told reporters she anticipates protest, calling President Trump’s rhetoric “painful” for some here.

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