Nan Whaley

The Dayton City Commission has unanimously passed a law requiring people to wear masks. It's a dramatic attempt by the city to stem the spread of the coronavirus as the state's economy reopens.

States and cities rely on business-generated tax revenue to help pay for employees delivering public services, like sanitation workers, first responders, health and safety workers, and librarians.

Until recently, that is.

In the six weeks since the coronavirus pandemic began ravaging U.S. businesses, more than 30 million Americans have filed for unemployment.

And with businesses tanking, many local governments are running out of money to pay for those public services.

Mayor Andrew Ginther tours the coronavirus "surge" site at the Greater Columbus Convention Center.
Greater Columbus Convention Center

Mayors around Ohio are calling on federal authorities to deliver more funding as coronavirus-caused job losses eat into local revenue.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley is calling for more federal aid to help the nation's smaller cities weather the coronavirus crisis.  Whaley is among a group of United States mayors who represent cities with fewer than half a million residents, who say the financial impacts of the pandemic could lead to widespread service reductions down the road.

In this Saturday, April 23, 2016 photo, members of the Ku Klux Klan participate in a "white pride" rally in Rome, Ga.
John Bazemore / Associated Press

Montgomery County has rejected a permit from a Ku Klux Klan group that wanted to hold another rally in Dayton.

Police officers in riot gear stand on Third Street as a small Indiana Klan group rallied in Courthouse Square in 2019..
Jess Mador / WYSO

The KKK-affiliated, Indiana-based hate group that rallied in Dayton last year has applied for a permit to do it again this fall.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley is criticizing a recent Federal Communications Commission decision approving the more than $3 billion acquisition of Cox Media by a private equity firm.

In an editorial in USA Today Thursday, Whaley and Michael Copps, a former FCC commissioner, say the deal paves the way for Dayton to lose its daily newspaper, a move proposed by the company Apollo Global Management last fall.

Dayton, Ohio, is a city that is used to getting knocked flat on its back.

Several state and local elected officials Friday launched a new yard-sign campaign advocating for stronger Ohio gun laws.

Joining Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley at a press conference in Dayton’s Oregon District were Montgomery County Auditor Karl Keith, State Sen. Peggy Lehner and representatives from the advocacy group Ohioans for Gun Safety.

Whaley announced the “Do Something” campaign outside the Trolley Stop tavern on Fifth St.

Gun Control In Ohio

Oct 9, 2019

Governor Mike DeWine in August -- and just days after a mass shooting in Dayton -- proposed the outline of a plan for mandatory background checks on private gun sales and a version of the so-called “red flag” law. On Monday, DeWine retreated from both proposals.

Instead, he proposed expanding the state’s “pink slip” system that hospitalizes people who are mentally ill for up to three days. And he proposed a plan to make it easier to prosecute the gun sellers.

Today on All Sides with Ann Fisher: the DeWine plan to address gun violence.

Guests:

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley is reacting to Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed changes to state gun laws. The governor unveiled details of his so-called STRONG Ohio bill Monday afternoon in Columbus.

Among the bill's proposed changes are voluntary measures allowing private gun buyers and sellers to request proof of background checks. The proposal would also expand the criteria used to keep guns out of the hands of people who pose a danger to themselves or others. 

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley testified on Capitol Hill Wednesday in support of stricter gun controls.

Speaking before a House Judiciary Committee Hearing on Assault Weapons, Whaley called on lawmakers to take assault weapons off the streets to stop shootings similar to the one in the city’s Oregon District that left nine people dead and nearly three dozen others injured.

Dayton, Ohio, Mayor Nan Whaley speaks to members of the media Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2019, outside Ned Peppers bar in the Oregon District after a mass shooting that occurred early Sunday morning in Dayton
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Leaders of the U.S. Conference of Mayors come to Columbus on Tuesday to lobby the federal government to pass gun control measures.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley joined a group of Congressional Democrats in Washington Monday to lobby for tighter gun regulations. The group that included Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer is calling for passage of a bill to expand background checks for gun purchases.

The bipartisan proposal known as H.R.8 would expand background checks to cover private firearm sales.

Mayor Whaley urged the Senate to bring the House bill to a vote.

Mayors are actively lobbying state lawmakers to consider a package of changes to gun laws and mental health policy unveiled by Gov. Mike DeWine in the wake of the Dayton mass shooting earlier this month.

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