naloxone

Jr de Barbosa / Wikimedia Commons

The Ohio Department of Medicaid announced that Medicaid will begin covering more medications to help with drug withdrawal symptoms, beginning in January.

Franklin County Reports 18 Fatal Overdoses In A Week

Sep 6, 2018
fentanyl
Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press

The coroner for the county that includes Ohio's capital city is warning of a spike in overdose deaths and encouraging friends and family members of addicts to obtain an overdose antidote.

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More than two dozen people have been treated for possible drug exposure at the Ross Correctional Institution in Chillicothe. Medical officials say the health scare was likely caused by some combination of opioids, and all of those sickened are expected to recover.

Wellness Wednesday: Overdose Awareness, Lyme Disease

Aug 29, 2018
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Lyme disease has tripled in the last two decades, according to the CDC. This insect-carried disease can cause symptoms like rashes, joint pain and headaches.

There used to be a vaccine for Lyme disease, but it was taken off the market because of low sales. Now, some doctors are calling for a change.

Today on Wellness Wednesday, we’ll talk about the future of treating Lyme disease, the antidote for opioid overdoses and more.

Guests:

U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams made a plea in April for more Americans to be prepared to administer naloxone, an opioid antidote, in case they or people close to them suffer an overdose.

"The call to action is to recognize if you're at risk," Adams told NPR's Rachel Martin. "And if you or a loved one are at risk, keep within reach, know how to use naloxone."

Naloxone Manufacturer Issues Recall

Jun 5, 2018

Naloxone manufacturer Hospira issued a voluntary recall of its single-use cartridge syringe system for the opioid overdose antidote.

The company says it found loose or embedded particulate matter on the syringe plunger. The recall is on lot numbers 7260LL and 76510LL.

If someone is exposed to the particulate, Hospira says there is a low chance of experiencing adverse health effects including allergic reactions and pulmonary dysfunction.

John Minchillo / Associated Press

Jordan, a college student in Central Ohio, is a lot like many of his classmates. He does well in school, has a part-time internship, a solid group of friends – and also uses cocaine.

It was a scheduling mishap that led Kourtnaye Sturgeon to help save someone’s life. About four months ago, Sturgeon drove to downtown Indianapolis for a meeting. She was a week early.

“I wasn’t supposed to be there,” she said.


The U.S. Surgeon General has issued an advisory, encouraging more Americans to carry the overdose reversing drug naloxone.

It comes in the form of an injection or a nasal spray, known as Narcan, and is regularly carried by firefighters, EMTs and police officers, but the antidote is also becoming more and more common in Ohio schools.

In Lisbon, Education is More Than English and Math

Students at David Anderson Junior and Senior High School in Lisbon, Ohio, file into the auditorium on a Thursday morning.

As opioid-related deaths have continued to climb, naloxone, a drug that can reverse overdoses, has become an important part of the public health response.

When people overdosing struggle to breathe, naloxone can restore normal breathing and save their lives. But the drug has to be given quickly.

On Thursday, U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams issued an advisory that encouraged more people to routinely carry naloxone.

While drug-related deaths continue to rise throughout Indiana, one county saw a decrease in drug fatalities in 2017.


Naloxone is an antidote that can help reverse drug overdoses.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Residents in Licking County can get online training about using naloxone and receive the opioid overdose reversal drug by mail through a new program billed as the first of its kind in the Ohio.

Akron’s Quick Response Team has become the first in Summit County to offer residents naloxone kits and training on how to use them to counter the effects of an opioid overdose.

Joseph Natko, the district chief of the Akron Fire Department, says the effort is part of a follow-up strategy with people who recently overdosed.

With the country in the throes of an epidemic, communities across the nation are being forced to confront the harrowing, and often fatal, effects of opioid abuse. But solutions — such as creating intervention programs in Ohio, providing access to treatment in Alabama, or investing in prevention initiatives in Missouri — cost money.

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In June, Middletown, Ohio, council member Dan Picard suggested that every time an ambulance responds to a drug overdose, the receiving patient be required to pay for the cost by performing community service. If that person experiences more than two overdoses but have not completed their community service, the 911 dispatcher will not send an ambulance.

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