NAFTA

Updated at 7:28 p.m. ET

The Senate overwhelmingly approved a revised North American trade pact in a rare bipartisan vote Thursday that hands President Trump a victory on a key campaign promise just as lawmakers are preparing his impeachment trial.

The U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, or USMCA, passed by a vote of 89-10. The trade pact, signed by the president in November 2018, received a similar bipartisan vote in the House last month.

Cows congregate at Waterman Farms in Columbus.
/ WOSU

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the bipartisan support for a new North American trade deal. Case Western Reserve University law professor Juscelino Colares joins the show.

Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, left, and Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, speak to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Sen. Sherrod Brown says he needs to take a closer look at the new U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement before making a decision.

Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, left, and Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, speak to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

With Congress back in session, Republicans say they are ready to pass the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement.

skeeze / Pixabay

Despite the U.S., Mexico, and Canada signing a deal to replace the North American Free Trade Agreement, tariffs and national politics have kept speedbumps in the way of closure. 

Ohio Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur says she will vote to defeat the new North American Free Trade Agreement worked out by the Trump Administration last fall. On Friday the Democrat said one of the reasons she is opposed to the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) is an expansion of drug company exclusivity. 

“You weren’t expecting that the pharmaceutical issue would be hidden in a trade bill but it is,” said Kaptur.

Updated at 8:25 a.m. ET

President Trump, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto signed the new U.S. Mexico Canada Agreement — or USMCA — in Buenos Aires Friday, using the backdrop of the G-20 Summit to resolve a trade dispute between America and its closest neighbors.

"Let's go," all three leaders said as they sat alongside each other to sign multiple copies of the deal.

The new trade deal with Canada and Mexico has been warmly welcomed by farmers, manufacturers and business groups across the country, but not always for the reasons President Trump anticipated.

While the president has touted improvements and changes as compared to North American Free Trade Agreement, many people are focusing on what didn't change and expressing relief that there's a deal at all.

Paul Vernon / Associated Press

In this week's Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU Public Media, Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the latest gubernatorial debate and how Obamacare has become a key issue in the campaign.

Flickr.com

The new trade deal between the U.S., Mexico and Canada could change the prices on the next car you drive, the medicine you take, and the milk you drink. That dairy portion was a big sticking point in negotiating with Canada about their complex dairy tariff system, and the changes are drawing praise from Ohio’s dairy industry.

Late Sunday night, the Trump Administration and Canada agreed on a deal to renew the North American Free Trade Agreement

The renamed U.S.-Mexico-Canada-Agreement (USMCA) addresses environmental issues including invasive species, pollution from ships, sustainable forestry, plastics pollution, and ozone protections.

Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

The U.S. and Canada reached a deal to replace the North American Free Trade Agreement, signed a quarter-century ago, with a new pact that the Trump administration says is easier to enforce.

In remarks in the Rose Garden formally announcing the agreement, President Trump called it "the most important trade deal we've ever made by far."

Ahead of a midnight deadline set by the White House, Trump approved changes that essentially revamp the 1993 NAFTA deal, bringing Canada on board after Mexico had already agreed in August.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / Associated Press

Canadian diplomat Douglas George gave a talk to the Columbus Metropolitan Club on Wednesday, as talks resume between the U.S. and Canada on the North American Free Trade Agreement.

Some of Ohio’s major exporting industries, including agriculture and automotive manufacturing, could suffer if the United States and Mexico make a trade deal without Canada.

The countries are reportedly in negotiations, trying to reach a deal on a revised North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA, by Friday. However, earlier this week, President Trump said that if Canada won't sign on, the U.S. and Mexico will do their own bilateral deal.

 

Rep. Tim Ryan
WKSU

Rep. Tim Ryan (D-Ohio) is hopeful about the tentative trade agreement between the United States and Mexico announced by President Trump on Monday.

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