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CAIR

A Hilliard man has been charged with vandalizing a Columbus-area mosque, in an incident that the Franklin County prosecutor and investigators are now calling a hate crime.

We know that in times of heightened stress, human instincts tell us to fight or flee. For some American Muslims, the current political climate has created a need for more Muslims to stand up and fight by seeking political office.

"Muslims didn't ask to be dragged into the spotlight, but now that we're there and we need to push back," said Robert McCaw, director of government affairs at the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR). "Getting into elected offices is one of the best means."

CAIR Wants Mosque Graffiti Investigated As Hate Crime

Feb 13, 2017
CAIR

The Council on American-Islamic Relations says it wants investigators looking into vandalism found at a northwest Columbus mosque on Friday to consider it a hate crime.

Two lawyers, three judges, thousands of ordinary Americans: On Tuesday night, oral arguments in Washington v. Trump attracted an unusually large audience for audio-only legal proceedings.

The case centers on President Trump's controversial executive order that would temporarily bar all new refugees from entering the U.S., as well as visa holders from seven majority-Muslim countries.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (Department of Homeland Security) / Wikimedia Commons

The fight over how the state should deal with immigration issues has Republicans and Democrats at the Statehouse backing competing bills. And both sides are already using strong language.

President Trump's executive order limiting immigration from majority-Muslim countries, which ignited protests across the country last weekend, joins a list of controversial presidential decrees through the years that have been aimed at foreign or domestic racial and ethnic groups.

Esther Honig

At Hampton Inn Hotel, a large group gathered early on Sunday afternoon and proceeded to march towards John Glenn International Airport. Within the hour, the group had swelled to more than 600 protesters, including two of Ohio's members of Congress. 

Updated at 1:30 p.m. ET

Police in Quebec City have arrested a suspect following a shooting at a mosque there that left six people dead and wounded eight others Sunday night. After initially saying they had two suspects in custody, police said Monday that they determined one of the men was instead a witness.

According to Canadian authorities, a gunman opened fire inside the Quebec City Islamic Cultural Centre around 8 p.m. ET, as about 40 people were gathered for evening prayers.

The Dar al-Hijrah mosque in Northern Virginia has seen its share of attention. Two of the hijackers in the Sept. 11 attacks prayed there, and jihadi propagandist Anwar al-Awlaki served as an imam at the mosque before heading off to Yemen to join al-Qaida.

Now, with a U.S. president-elect who has suggested he will take a hard line with Muslim-Americans, the worshipers at Dar al-Hijrah again are bracing for scrutiny and looking for reassurance.

Esther Honig

At the Abubakar Assidiq Islamic Center on the Columbus's West Side, over a hundred people from around the city gathered for Friday afternoon prayers. The themes of the sermon? Communication between parents and their children, and the issues of radicalization and Islamophobia.

At an off-campus coffee shop Monday, Ohio State University senior Mohamed Farah catches up on his homework.

"I didn't get a lot of work done today just because there's a lot going on," he says. "I tried to stay away from the news, but I kept going back to it."

Farah first learned of an attack on campus when security sent a text to the entire university: "Active shooter on campus: Run Hide Fight."

A surrogate of President-elect Donald Trump on Wednesday invoked Japanese internment camps as precedent for creating a registry for Muslim immigrants. This comes less than a week after the Kansas secretary of state told Reuters that Trump's team might reprise a post-Sept. 11 national registry of immigrants from countries regarded as havens for "extremist activity."

Such conversations in the president-elect's circles have raised new concerns about civil rights among advocates for American Muslims.

Andy L / Flickr

ATLANTA (AP) - The FBI says the number of hate crimes reported to police increased by about 6.7 percent last year, led largely by a 67 percent surge in crimes against Muslims.

Columbus City Hall
Derek Jensen / Wikimedia Commons

On Monday, the Columbus City Council unanimously passed a resolution condemning Islamophobia.  Passage followed a roundtable discussion at Columbus City Hall conducted by various faith leaders in Central Ohio. 

In the latest installment of 89.7’s New American Voices series, a profile of Tursunay Awut, a member of the Eurasian ethnic group known as Uyghurs. She and her family left China several years ago and eventually settled in Bexley.

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