Mike DeWine | WOSU Radio

Mike DeWine

In this November 2005 file photo, Larry Greene, public information director of the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility, demonstrates how a curtain is pulled between the death chamber and witness room at the prison in Lucasville, Ohio.
Kiichiro Sato / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown talk about if capital pubishment will be able to continue in the state.

Andrew Welsh Huggins, a reporter with the Associated Press in Columbus and author of the book No Winners Here Tonight: Race, Politics, and Geography in One of the Country's Busiest Death Penalty States, joins the show.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, left, speaks alongside Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, right, during a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton.
John Minchillo / AP

Gov. Mike DeWine signed an executive order Wednesday to establish the Ohio School Safety Center, saying more needs to be done to make sure Ohio’s schools are safe.

The last thing that Nan Whaley, the Democratic mayor of Dayton, wants to hear in the wake of the tragedy that rocked her city on the early morning of Aug. 4 is the usual partisan bickering and excuses by politicians who are in the pocket of special interests.

She doesn't want to hear it.

Southern Ohio Correctional Facility in Lucasville, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Gov. Mike DeWine says that no executions will take place in Ohio anytime soon, saying the state can’t find a method for executions under state law that would get approval from a federal court. The governor also dismissed a proposal by state Rep. Scott Wiggam (R-Wooster) to use an illegal opioid for lethal injections.

Weekly Reporter Roundtable

Aug 19, 2019
The Ohio Statehouse in downtown Columbus.
Wikimedia

State Senate Democrats have proposed legislation that would require background checks on firearms sales and impose stricter rules on guns sales to minors.

Similar measures stalled last session, but inspired by the mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton, Republicans are stepping up with a GOP co-sponsor and the support of Governor Mike DeWine.

Today on the All Sides with Ann Fisher Weekly Reporter Roundtable: state lawmakers take on gun-control. 

Gov. Mike DeWine unveils 17-point plan to reduce gun violence.
Ohio Governor Office

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the ongoing debate over the governor's proposed gun regulations. Dean Rieck, executive director of the Buckeye Firearms Association, joins the show. 

Marijuana plants
Jim Mone / AP

Ohio cities and law enforcement agencies continue to raise concerns that they can’t easily prosecute people for small amounts of marijuana because of the state’s new law allowing hemp and CBD oil. Some say the problem is there’s no good way to test the differences between marijuana and hemp. 

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine and former Ohio Gov. John Kasich
AP

One of Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed gun law changes in the wake of the Dayton shooting is an idea that’s been talked about before and passed in 17 other states. The bill more commonly known as a "red flag law" would provide a way to remove guns from people who are thought to be dangerous to themselves or others.

How you are judged as an elected official has much more to do with how you respond in the worst of times than in the best of times.

Ohio's Republican governor, veteran politician Mike DeWine, is finding that out right now.

Chris Dorr gestures during an 80 minute video on the Facebook page of the group he leads, Ohio Gun Owners.
Ohio Gun Owners / Facebook

The Ohio Highway Patrol is reviewing comments made by a leader of a pro-gun rights group following the unveiling of a package of gun control proposals by Gov. Mike DeWine.

In this Jan. 16, 2013 file photo, an assortment of firearms are seen for sale at Capitol City Arms Supply in Springfield, Ill.
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

Gun regulation advocates say they're ready to start working with Gov. Mike DeWine and other lawmakers to pass what they call "common sense" measures.

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine says he’s moving forward with efforts to tighten gun regulations in the state. 

Mourners gather for a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

In this week's episode of Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss how recent mass shooting have pushed some lawmakers to propose new gun legislation. Ohioans for Gun Safety spokesperson Dennis Willard joins the show.

Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) has said he wants input from gun rights advocates as he works on his plan to reduce gun violence, but some of Ohio's largest groups seem to be split on his proposal.

Gov. Mike DeWine unveils 17-point plan to reduce gun violence.
Ohio Governor Office

Gov. Mike DeWine is calling for a version of the "Red Flag Law," expanded background checks, and other gun control proposals in the wake of the mass shooting in Dayton that left nine people dead. These proposals represent a dramatic shift in the way Ohio's state leadership has handled gun policies for most of the decade.

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