#MeToo | WOSU Radio

#MeToo

U.S. women would have to work an extra 47 days each year to earn as much as men do, says Christine Lagarde, managing director of the International Monetary Fund.

"Because U.S. women earn 82 percent of what men earn," she told NPR's Steve Inskeep.

There's a lot happening on the pay equity front.

A law professor in Illinois wants to put a stop to a medical practice that she says treats women’s bodies like cadavers. 

Across most of the U.S., teaching hospitals allow medical students to conduct pelvic exams on female patients without their knowledge or explicit consent. 


In the wake of recent allegations of sexual misconduct in classical music settings near and far, Oberlin Conservatory of Music is taking specific steps to change the culture.

The conservatory's actions are part of Oberlin College's school-wide focus on the issue.

Updated at 2:40 p.m. ET

Google employees worldwide are walking off the job to protest the company's treatment of women and its handling of sexual assault cases.

They walked out of Google offices at 11:10 a.m. local time Thursday in Singapore, Zurich, London, Dublin and New York City, filling nearby streets, sidewalks and parks.

And in California, home to Google's headquarters, employees streamed out of its offices into plazas.

One year after the #MeToo movement took off, new NPR-Ipsos polls show the nation deeply divided on sexual assault and harassment, with fissures running more along party lines than gender.

Most — 69 percent — of more than 1,000 Americans surveyed, say the movement has created a climate in which offenders will now be held accountable. But more than 40 percent feel the movement has gone too far.

The Cleveland Orchestra has fired two of its star musicians following accusations of sexual misconduct — including with multiple students — that have come to light in recent months. The two men are William Preucil, the Orchestra’s concertmaster and lead violinist, and Massimo La Rosa, its principal trombonist.

Ohio governor candidates Democratic Richard Cordray and Republican Mike DeWine speak to reporters following their third debate at Cleveland State University.
Angelo Merendino / AP

Since President Trump took office, thousands of Ohio women have taken to the White House and the Statehouse, advocating for abortion rights, equal pay and lambasting what they see as misogyny in government policies.

The slogan “Remember in November” became one of their rallying cries. But will they?

Updated at 6:26 p.m. ET

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and the woman accusing him of sexual assault more than three decades ago, Christine Blasey Ford, will both testify publicly before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 24. The committee was supposed to vote on the nomination this Thursday but faced pressure after Ford went public with her allegation over the weekend.

Ford and Kavanaugh both agreed to testify under oath before the committee.

Jay LaPrete / Associated Press

Betty Sutton, Ohio's Democratic lieutenant governor candidate, is adding her voice to the #MeToo movement, sharing details of alleged abuse that led to her then-husband's arrest in the 1980s.

In 2016, reports surfaced of women being drugged at bars near local universities. Meanwhile, another bar was getting negative attention on social media for hiring bartenders with a history of sexual assault. To Maria Cole and Kendra Massey, that meant it was time to take a nationwide program and bring it local.

The #MeToo movement has been a cultural reckoning across industries, from Hollywood to restaurants — but one of the oldest that's been affected is classical music. In March, James Levine, a longtime conductor of the Metropolitan Opera in New York City, was fired for allegations of sexual misconduct. And now, centuries-old works from Carmen to Don Giovanni are being challenged for misogynistic plots and themes.

Finally, we no longer have to use the word "allegedly."

A court of law has delivered a verdict that the court of public opinion seemed to have already reached: Bill Cosby, 80, has been found guilty of three counts of aggravated indecent assault, resulting from allegations first made by Andrea Constand back in 2005.

The public eventually saw more than 60 women accuse "America's dad" of sexual misconduct and assault, with many alleging he surreptitiously drugged them first. This is the first of those stories to get a verdict.

Back in October 2017, women took to social media to share their experiences of sexual harassment. The #MeToo movement went viral, spurring a national and global discussion on the issue.

Many women have since come forward with their experiences of being sexually harassed by colleagues and bosses, costing influential men in the entertainment industry and the media — including journalists here at NPR — their jobs.

From a hashtag to a movement, #MeToo is generating conversations around the world.

It’s also inspiring artists here in Northeast Ohio.

Cleveland painter Laura Dumm decided to depict Venus, the goddess of love, as a #MeToo survivor. While she typically works collaboratively with her husband, Gary, on artwork critical of environmental and societal issues, it felt right to her to do this work independently.

Ken Howard / The Metropolitan Opera

Opera Abbreviated is a Classical 101 podcast that previews The Metropolitan Opera's Live in HD series of performances beamed into cinemas worldwide.

The Met's new production of Giacomo Puccini's Tosca, everyone's favorite operatic potboiler, is the next feature, showing at 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 27. Staged by David McVicar, the production is conducted by Emmanuel Villaume and stars Sonya Yoncheva, Vittorio Grigolo and  Zelkjo Lucic.

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