Mental Health

Anti-Bullying in 2019

Feb 7, 2019
Weng Tong Neo / Flickr

Bullying is considered the most common form of violence experienced by young people in the country. A new report from the YouthTruth student survey found that not only have bullying rates increased in the last few years, but students of color at majority white schools experienced higher rates bullying.  Today on All Sides, the impact of bullying and how to address it.  

Ashoor Rasho has spent more than half his life alone in a prison cell in Illinois — 22 to 24 hours a day. The cell was so narrow he could reach his arms out and touch both walls at once.

"It was pretty broke down — the whole system, the way they treated us," says the 43-year-old Rasho, who has been diagnosed with several mental health conditions, including severe depression, schizophrenia and borderline personality disorder.

U.S. House Oversight And Government Reform Committee/Flickr

A new report by a coalition of social service groups says state leaders need to invest more in families, seniors and low-income residents when they approve the next two-year state budget. 

Yvonne Martin keeps detailed notes of two years in her life. It starts on March 1, 2016. That’s the day her son, Daniel, first ran away from the family’s home near Evansville, Ind.

He was 13.

Paige Pfleger

Ohio opened its first in-patient mental health care unit specifically for the LGBTQ population on Monday.

Paulina Nieto, who grew up in Columbus, Indiana, was only 2 months old when she started to have heart problems due to a narrow artery.

Vape cartridges are on display durIng the CBD Express store grand opening in Salem, Ore.
Timothy J. Gonzalez / Associated Press

Parents from the Cleveland area are making an unusual request: They want the Cleveland School District to administer CBD oil to their children during school.

Adora Namigadde / WOSU

Volunteers use a golf cart to shuffle veterans from a parking lot to a pond in Galloway. It’s a crisp fall day, and the calm water is full of fish.

Crickets chirp distantly and fishers slush through the grass to find private spots to fish. A few Columbus Crew SC players are even on hand to mingle with veterans.

Former Marine Lance Cpl. Josh Onan was in Ramadi, Iraq, in 2006 when his Humvee was hit by a roadside bomb.

"I remember laying down in the truck," Onan said. "Waking up, there's dust, there's debris all over me, and there's an Iraqi colonel who's sitting in the truck with us, and he's just screaming, screaming. I don't understand what he's saying."

Onan suffered a head injury and post-traumatic stress disorder. During the next year, he was in and out of trouble with military officials, mainly for small infractions, which he chalks up to the medications he was taking.

Alban Gonzalez / Flickr

When Matthew Timion needed to get his son treatment for mental illness, he did not anticipate it would be so hard to get the insurance company to pay for it.

Franklin County Courthouse
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

Franklin County’s juvenile court is holding a public event Thursday at 2 p.m. to talk about the effectiveness of a program aimed at helping youth with substance abuse or mental health issues.

Nick Evans / WOSU

Doctors, nurses and staffers lined up for t-shirts, temporary tattoos and even some early morning ice cream at Nationwide Children’s Hospital near German Village. In honor of World Mental Health Day, the hospital has launched an initiative spotlighting the issue among children.

Lakewood High School Walkout / Twitter

One school district wants funding to expand mental health services. The district next door wants to hire more school resource officers. Another neighboring district wants both.

Gov. John Kasich talks about the latest official fatal overdose numbers from the Ohio Department of Health at a Statehouse press conference.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Gov. John Kasich says his Medicaid department has made some changes to required background checks on behavioral and mental health providers – a requirement that came from an executive order he signed in July. The change is good news to hundreds of providers who feared for their jobs.

Why Your Sense Of Smell Could Be A Clue To Alzheimer's Disease

Sep 28, 2018

Your sense of smell may give doctors early clues as to whether you’ll deal with Alzheimer’s disease. Since there’s no cure for Alzheimer’s disease, researchers are focused on ways to identify early signs and create treatments before dementia sets in. 


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