Mental Health

More than three in five Americans are lonely, with more and more people reporting feeling like they are left out, poorly understood and lacking companionship, according to a new survey released Thursday. Workplace culture and conditions may contribute to Americans' loneliness.

guns on display in a gun store
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

The leader of the Ohio House had pointed to a bill that would change gun and mental health laws as an alternative to Gov. Mike DeWine’s anti-gun violence package. The proposal that is likely to be opposed by some Republicans.

As a college student, Katy Milkman played tennis and loved going to the gym. But when she started graduate school, her exercise routine started to flunk.

"At the end of a long day of classes, I was exhausted," Milkman says. "Frankly, the last thing I wanted to do was drag myself to the gym. What I really wanted to do was watch TV or read Harry Potter."

Columbus Police transport a client to a local hospital after responding to a mental health call.
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

Social worker Kristin Moreland changes the car radio from a country station to one that plays Top 40 Hits.          

“He’ll probably change it back,” Moreland says, gesturing to Columbus Police officer Bob Heinzman.

Federal law mandates insurers treat mental health services like they would physical health care. But the sponsors of a new bill in the Ohio Legislature say that’s not happening. 

The Ohio State University

According to an Associated Press review, The Ohio State University saw a 69% increase in students seeking mental health treatment in the last five years.

In 1983, Indianapolis hosted one of the first summits on the emotional and psychological mistreatment of children. This week,  local, state and international leaders are meeting in the city, looking for new ways to tackle the problem. 

OxyContin pills are arranged for a photo at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vermont.
Toby Talbot / AP

Ohio's annual conference of behavioral health workers comes at an interesting time in the field. Though still burdened by the opioid epidemic, counties across the state say they’re heartened by Gov. Mike DeWine’s focus on mental health and recovery.

Allen Breed / Associated Press

Gov. Mike DeWine’s gun violence plan calls for using Ohio’s “pink slip” process to separate people thought to be dangerous from their guns. However, the Republican leader of the Ohio House says many in the party don’t agree with that approach.

Mark Butler's son Andrew needed to be placed in a residential mental health treatment center, but insurance wouldn't pay.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

In May, WOSU shared the story of the Butler family, whose son Andrew has a severe intellectual disability that causes sometimes-violent outbursts.

guns on display in a gun store
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

A new study from The Ohio State University shows firearm suicides decreased slightly in states where the mental health workforce grew.

gun in holster
Eric Gay / Associated Press

The ACLU of Ohio is raising concerns about a bill that would mandate more reporting of information into a database used for gun background checks.

Cecily King, right, and her daughter Odessa hang a sign that says "If You're Going Through Hell Keep Going" over a Columbus highway.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

You are enough. You are valuable. You are worthy.

Mantras like these have been appearing on highway overpasses and bridges across Columbus over the last few months.

Gov. Mike DeWine signs the executive order creating the Ohio Narcotics Intelligence Center on July 31, 2019.
Olivia Miltner / WOSU

Gov. Mike DeWine's 17-point plan to address gun violence in the state following the recent mass shooting includes freeing up space at state psychiatric hospitals for people threatening violence or suicide.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine says he expects to share the language of a gun-reform package with state lawmakers within days. The proposal would include measures the governor first discussed in the wake of the August 4 mass shooting in Dayton. 

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