Mental Health

Coronavirus And Mental Health

Mar 18, 2020
young adult with hands in hair.
Firesam! / Flickr Creative Commons

Anxiety levels are on the rise as Americans contend with unprecedented disruptions to their everyday lives.

In the last three weeks, the number of people self-identifying with severe anxiety has gone up.

That’s according to screening data from Mental Health America, the nation’s leading community-based nonprofit dedicated to mental health.

When kids at Warner Arts Magnet Elementary School act up, they aren't sent straight to the principal's office. Instead, many students at the high-poverty school in Nashville, Tenn., go to the "BeWell" room.

The serene space is awash in sunlight and brimming with plants. There are yoga mats, toys, a lounging nook and soothing music drifting out of a desk speaker. In this room, teacher Riki Rattner, who is also trained as a yoga instructor, helps students practice deep breathing and check in with their emotions.

Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) is doubling down on his commitment to renew education funding for student wellness programs saying these services can play a vital role in a student's education.

It's recreation time at a Los Angeles County jail known as the Twin Towers. Nearly a dozen disheveled young men stand docilely as they munch on sandwiches out of brown paper bags.

They're half-naked except for sleeveless, thick, blanket-like restraints wrapped around them like medieval garments.

All are chained and handcuffed to shiny metal tables bolted to the floor.

"It's lunchtime and they're actually [in] programming right now," says a veteran guard, LA County Sheriff's Deputy Myron Trimble.

Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Tammy’s struggle with substance use started with pain pills she found in her grandmother’s cabinet. Then it escalated to heroin.

The new Columbus Police Wellness Bureau.
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

Ohio is one step closer to granting workers' compensation to first responders with post-traumatic stress disorder. The policy change would base benefits off of the mental health condition rather than requiring an accompanying physical injury.

pride flag
Karen Desuyo / Flickr

A bipartisan bill would ban Ohio children under 18-years-old from participating in so-called conversion therapy, the discredited practice of trying to change a person's sexual orientation.

Maurice Clarett in a Red Zone hoodie
Maurice Clarett / Twitter

Former Ohio State football player Maurice Clarett says he shut down the Columbus office of an agency that helps children with mental health issues because it wasn’t performing up to standards.

Ohio State president Michael Drake is leaving his position at the end of the school year.
The Ohio State University

Ohio State University president Michael Drake gave his final "State of the University" address Thursday, speaking about student debt as well as mental health.

iphone
Pixabay

Ohio State students now have access to a new wellness app to find mental health resources.

Ohio Statehouse cupola
Shih-Pei Chang / Flickr

The deadline has passed for communities throughout the state to submit their requests for Ohio’s capital budget, which is expected sometime near the end of March, when Gov. Mike DeWine will deliver his State of the State speech.

More than three in five Americans are lonely, with more and more people reporting feeling like they are left out, poorly understood and lacking companionship, according to a new survey released Thursday. Workplace culture and conditions may contribute to Americans' loneliness.

guns on display in a gun store
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

The leader of the Ohio House had pointed to a bill that would change gun and mental health laws as an alternative to Gov. Mike DeWine’s anti-gun violence package. The proposal that is likely to be opposed by some Republicans.

As a college student, Katy Milkman played tennis and loved going to the gym. But when she started graduate school, her exercise routine started to flunk.

"At the end of a long day of classes, I was exhausted," Milkman says. "Frankly, the last thing I wanted to do was drag myself to the gym. What I really wanted to do was watch TV or read Harry Potter."

Columbus Police transport a client to a local hospital after responding to a mental health call.
Adora Namigadde / WOSU

Social worker Kristin Moreland changes the car radio from a country station to one that plays Top 40 Hits.          

“He’ll probably change it back,” Moreland says, gesturing to Columbus Police officer Bob Heinzman.

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