Mental Health

Columbus City Hall on April 15, 2020.
David Holm / WOSU

The city’s Commission On Black Girls is putting forward a list of recommendations to improve the quality of life for African American girls and women in Columbus.

Adolescent Mental Health Issues Magnified By COVID-19

Jul 28, 2020
Teen sitting alone using phone.
Fangirl / Pixabay

This episode originally aired on July 15, 2020.

Nearly one in five adolescents has a diagnosable mental health disorder, and nearly one-third of them show signs of depression.

Adolescent Mental Health Issues Magnified By COVID-19

Jul 17, 2020
Teen sitting alone using phone.
Fangirl / Pixabay

This episode originally aired on July 15, 2020.

Nearly one in five adolescents has a diagnosable mental health disorder, and nearly one-third of them show signs of depression.

That’s according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, using data compiled before the pandemic.

Adolescent Mental Health Issues Magnified By COVID-19

Jul 15, 2020
Teen sitting alone using phone.
Fangirl / Pixabay

Nearly one in five adolescents has a diagnosable mental health disorder, and nearly one-third of them show signs of depression.

That’s according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, using data compiled before the pandemic.

A new study published in the Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine warns that health care providers may be experiencing increased burnout due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Cleveland Clinic anesthesiologist and study co-author Dr. Praveen Chahar said provider burnout isn’t new, but dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic has caused even more stress.

“One of the biggest reasons of increased stress in healthcare providers was a fear of getting infected themselves and a fear of infecting their loved ones,” he said.

Brandon Duncan describes himself as fearless. So when he first heard news reports about the novel coronavirus, the 30-year-old wasn’t afraid for himself. 

“I’m like, how is this going to affect Danny?” he says.

Pictures of the brain in COVID-19 patients are yielding clues that may help identify the virus sooner.

WOSU's project Letters From Home is sharing stories from isolation—how Ohioans are getting through this pandemic, alone and together. While the coronavirus has undoubtedly impacted the physical health of the nation, it's taking a toll on mental health as well.

Studies have found the rates of mental illness and suicide are higher for farmers. They work long hours, have limited social contact and are at the mercy of factors such as weather. Now the COVID-19 pandemic is creating even greater challenges to their livelihood—and mental health. 

Some fear the stress of social isolation, historic unemployment and health fears during the pandemic threatens our mental health. Dozens of national organizations raised concerns to Congress that the U.S. is unprepared to handle what may be a mental health crisis.

Grace Zoldak, a high school student in Mt. Vernon, wrote in to WOSU's Letters From Home series about her experiences during the pandemic.
Grace Zoldak

WOSU's project Letters From Home shares stories from isolation—how Ohioans are getting through the pandemic, alone and together. In addition to adding new challenges to our lives, the coronavirus has also complicated old ones. 

In the weeks and months following May 4, 1970, life for Kent State students changed completely. The university responded to the shootings by halting on-campus classes and creating a type of pre-Internet distance learning for students, and students and faculty had to change the way they learned and taught.

The students were, of course, emotionally changed by the experience as well, and the approach to mental health care at the time was quite different than today. 

Coronavirus And Mental Health

Mar 18, 2020
young adult with hands in hair.
Firesam! / Flickr Creative Commons

Anxiety levels are on the rise as Americans contend with unprecedented disruptions to their everyday lives.

In the last three weeks, the number of people self-identifying with severe anxiety has gone up.

That’s according to screening data from Mental Health America, the nation’s leading community-based nonprofit dedicated to mental health.

When kids at Warner Arts Magnet Elementary School act up, they aren't sent straight to the principal's office. Instead, many students at the high-poverty school in Nashville, Tenn., go to the "BeWell" room.

The serene space is awash in sunlight and brimming with plants. There are yoga mats, toys, a lounging nook and soothing music drifting out of a desk speaker. In this room, teacher Riki Rattner, who is also trained as a yoga instructor, helps students practice deep breathing and check in with their emotions.

Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) is doubling down on his commitment to renew education funding for student wellness programs saying these services can play a vital role in a student's education.

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