medicare

The Ohio Public Employees Retirement System (OPERS) dropped the hammer on proposed changes to shore up the solvency of its health care trust fund. In a 9-2 vote Wednesday, OPERS' Board of Trustees approved cuts to its health care benefits that will affect its current and future retirees. "Morning Edition" host Amy Eddings got into the details with OPERS spokesman Michael Pramik.

Thousands of retirees will see changes to their health care benefits after the Ohio Public Employees Retirement System (OPERS) Board of Directors approved a new plan for the way members receive assistance.

Vowing to protect Medicare with "every ounce of strength," President Trump spoke last week to a cheering crowd in Florida. But his executive order released shortly afterward includes provisions that could significantly alter key pillars of the program by making it easier for beneficiaries and doctors to opt out.

Updated at 4:30 p.m. ET

President Trump gave a speech and signed an executive order on health care Thursday, casting the "Medicare for All" proposals from his Democratic rivals as harmful to seniors.

His speech, which had been billed as a policy discussion, had the tone of a campaign rally. Trump spoke from The Villages, a huge retirement community in Florida outside Orlando, a deep-red part of a key swing state.

As Democratic candidates for president try to walk a political tightrope between the party's progressive wing and its center-left, they are facing increasing pressure to outline the details of their health care overhaul proposals.

On Wednesday, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., who is running in Democratic primaries, reaffirmed his stance on health care by reintroducing a "Medicare-for-all" bill, the idea that fueled his 2016 presidential run.

"Medicare-for-all," once widely considered a fringe proposal for providing health care in the U.S., is getting more popular. Several Democratic presidential hopefuls are getting behind the idea.

Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., endorsed the approach Monday in a CNN town hall-style event, saying her aim would be to eliminate all private insurance.

Columbus Division of Fire
WOSU

Earlier this year, the Ohio police and fire pension fund’s board decided to shift from group insurance to a monthly stipend that allows retirees to buy their own insurance.

Affordable Care Act in 2018

Nov 21, 2018
health care
Pexals

Democrats regained control of the House of Representatives in the midterms earlier this month. Their campaign messages focused heavily on healthcare for Americans.

Now that they’re in power, Republicans chances to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act are squashed.

Along with federal protection, Idaho, Nebraska, and Utah, voted to expand Medicaid in the most recent election.

Today on All Sides, where healthcare stands in American and what to expect in 2019.

Since the start of October, New York Democrat Antonio Delgado has posted 14 ads on YouTube. Some show him out greeting voters. Others are attack ads on his opponent, Republican Rep. John Faso. But the overwhelming majority — all but one of the ads — mention health care.

Medicare has lowered its star ratings for staffing levels in 1 in 11 of the nation’s nursing homes — almost 1,400 of them — because they either had inadequate numbers of registered nurses or failed to provide payroll data that proved they had the required nursing coverage, federal records released last week show.

Medicare only recently began collecting and publishing payroll data on the staffing of nursing homes as required by the Affordable Care Act of 2010, rather than relying as it had before on the nursing homes’ own unverified reports.

Thirteen socialists walk into a West Virginia bar.

It's a Saturday evening in early July, and the North Central West Virginia chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America is getting together at a brewery outside of Rivesville.

Everyone here has their own stories for how they came to socialism. For chapter co-founder Kelley Rose, a 36-year-old who works for a nonprofit helping young adults stay in school and find jobs, religion played a big part.

Sen. Sherrod Brown
Andrew Harnik / Associated Press

Tax cuts and immigration – two issues that promise to define Ohio’s U.S. Senate race – moved to center stage this week.

A new study shows that since 2008, more white people in the United States oppose welfare programs, in part because of increasing "racial resentment."

One of the reasons for this opposition, according to the report, is white Americans' perceptions that they might be losing their financial and social status while people of color make gains in those areas.

A simple question at the pharmacy could unlock savings for millions of Medicare beneficiaries.

Under a little-known Medicare rule, they can pay a lower cash price for prescriptions instead of using their insurance and doling out the amount the policy requires. But only if they ask.

That is because pharmacists say their contracts with drug plans often contain "gag orders" forbidding them from volunteering this information.

This story was originally published February 6. It has been updated as of February 9 at 1 pm.

The Atchison-Holt Ambulance District spans two counties and 1,100 square miles in the far northwest corner of Missouri. The EMTs who drive these ambulances cover nearly 10 times more land area than their counterparts in Omaha, the nearest major city. 

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