medical marijuana

Ohio House

In this week's Snollygoster, Ohio's political podcast from WOSU Public Media, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss how the Ohio House finally quieted the storm over the next speaker. The calm should last, oh, about six months.

Meanwhile, qualifying patients hoping for some green relief likely won't be getting medical marijuana by the state's September deadline.

Ohio Senate

The state’s medical marijuana program is not going to be ready for patients on the scheduled start date on September 8. And there's no clear idea on when it will begin.

Eric Gay / Associated Press

Ohio said Tuesday that it will not have medical marijuana available by the September 8 deadline.

Ohio has licensed 56 locations that can sell medical marijuana once it becomes legal this fall, including five in Franklin County.

The Ohio pharmacy board is expected to announce today what businesses will be allowed to sell medical marijuana beginning this September.

The nearly five-dozen dispensary licenses are the next step in a series of permits Ohio is requiring to grow and sell medical marijuana beginning Sept. 8.  The awards had been expected to be made at a special meeting of the pharmacy board late last month. But it cancelled that meeting because of unexpected delays validating that each applicant met minimum standards. 

Weekly Reporter Roundtable

Jun 4, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

The debate between Ohio House Republicans over who should be the chamber's speaker has been going on for several weeks. With a divided Republican party, House Democrats have an opportunity to influence the debate. 

Join us as we discuss the speakership, as well as the importance of the ECOT scandal in this year's elections, the Ohio Stand Your Ground Bill, the prospect of medical marijuana in Ohio, and more.

Ohio’s medical marijuana problem has hit another snag.

Thirty U.S. states have enacted medical cannabis laws, and all but one of them include cancer in the list of conditions allowed. Such laws give cancer patients across the country access to a substance that remains illegal under federal law. Anecdotal reports suggest it’s helpful in managing symptoms of chemotherapy, like pain and nausea.

Legal Marijuana Oregon
Gosia Wozniacka / Associated Press

Glen Miller sits in the second row of his Horticulture 101 class, listening as his professor gives a lecture on plant biology. At 61, Miller took a buyout from his former employer—a telecommunications company—and decided instead of retiring, he’d enroll in a training program for a second career. A career in cannabis.

Eric Gay / Associated Press

Ohio’s medical marijuana program is supposed to be fully operational on September 8. But there are several court battles over problems with the process of choosing cultivators, and some fear it might delay the start of the program. 

Ohio has licensed its first batch of doctors who are permitted to recommend marijuana to patients. One of them is Dr. Noah Miller, a child psychiatrist in Pepper Pike, who can recommend cannabis through his work with a separate clinic run by a colleague, Compassionate Cleveland. Currently, he’s able to write letters confirming that a patient can use medical marijuana.

Last week, John Boehner, the retired congressman from Ohio and former Speaker of the House of Representatives, announced on Twitter that he was getting into the weed game:

"I'm joining the board of #AcreageHoldings because my thinking on cannabis has evolved," Boehner wrote. "I'm convinced de-scheduling the drug is needed so we can do research, help our veterans, and reverse the opioid epidemic ravaging our communities."

Ohio’s medical marijuana program likely won’t be fully grown by the fall.

John Boehner, former speaker of the House, became an unlikely advocate for marijuana on Wednesday.

Reversing years of opposition to the drug when he served in Congress, the Republican announced that his "thinking on cannabis has evolved."

He tweeted that he was joining the Board of Advisors of Acreage Holdings, a corporation formerly known as High Street Capital Partners that operates cannabis cultivation, processing and dispensing across 11 states.

North Ridgeville resident Adrian Frederick said he’s had horrible leg pain for years, caused by a surgery he had involving cancer. The pain is constant, and gets worse at night.

“I’m just willing to try anything at this point,” Frederick said. “I’m just sick of being in pain all the time.”

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