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Medicaid

Months of tax revenues coming in under estimates have Gov. John Kasich trimming back his two-year state budget by $800 million. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports that has budget watchers wondering what will be cut.

Nothing is off limits

The state has a $615 million shortfall in this year’s budget, with revenues coming in behind forecasts for eight of the last nine months. With that in mind, Gov. John Kasich announced he’s pulling back his budget proposal by $400 million for each of the two years in the spending plan. 

John Kasich
File photo / John Kasich

Gov. John Kasich had strong words for leaders in Washington from his own party. Kasich’s comments came amid uncertainty over Ohio’s fiscal future.

Gov. John Kasich delivers the State of the State speech in Sandusky on April 4, 2017.
DANIEL KONIK / Ohio Public Radio

Budget, taxes, education, drugs - Gov. John Kasich covered a lot of ground in his State of the State speech in Sandusky. 

Faced with a huge and deadly opioid crisis that’s killing eight people a day in Ohio, Kasich proposed some new money toward the battle – from the state fund best known for backing high-tech ideas.

doctor
Pixabay

Some 700,000 Ohioans are covered under Medicaid expansion, and Gov. John Kasich continues to push for the federal government to continue Medicaid expansion in any future health care reform. But he’s also argued that states should have flexibility. That could mean thousands of very poor people might lose Medicaid coverage.

More than 40 senators have signed a letter to President Donald Trump asking him to rescind his executive order promising to repeal the Affordable Care Act.  In exchange, the senators offer to work with the Trump administration to amend the healthcare act. Ohio Democrat Sherrod Brown is among the group of senators.


Gov. John Kasich speaking at a podium
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The White House is reportedly quietly restarting talks on health care reform, after the bill President Trump and Republicans back was pulled just hours before a vote on Friday. Gov. John Kasich said he was working on that issue too this week.

House Minority Leader Fred Strahorn (D-Dayton).
DAN KONIK

The proposal from Congressional Republicans to repeal the Affordable Care Act would dramatically cut funding to Medicaid, and Medicaid expansion in particular. That’s the looming issue as lawmakers try to move forward with the state budget.

Since Congressional Republicans released their proposed replacement of the Affordable Care Act, some members of the party have been speaking out against elements of it. That includes Gov. John Kasich.

Weekly Reporter Roundtable

Mar 13, 2017
Alexander Smith / Wikipedia Commons

Congressional republicans unveiled their replacement for the Affordable Care Act on Monday. The bill faced backlash from both democrats and republicans, but despite opposition from doctors and consumer groups it claimed a large victory on Thursday by clearing two panels . Today we'll discuss this and the latest in state and national news with a panel of reporters.

Both of Ohio’s US Senators were very concerned about what would happen to the 700,000 Ohioans now on Medicaid through the Affordable Care Act if the ACA was repealed. Now that the House has released its plan, one is completely opposed, but the other isn’t totally sold on it either.

healthcare.gov

Ohio activists on both sides of the political aisle are reacting to Congressional Republicans’ plan to replace the Affordable Care Act.

Medicaid Expansion Repeal

Mar 7, 2017
Ohio Governor John Kasich
Marc Nozell / Flickr

Almost 1 million Ohioans receive health insurance through Medicaid, which was expanded back in 2014 under Gov. John Kasich. As congressional republicans are considering alternatives to the Affordable Care Act, nearly 700,000 of those people could lose their health insurance if Medicaid expansions are repealed. Today we'll discuss the future of Medicaid and what a repeal of the 2014 expansion would mean for Ohioans. 

Guests:

In recent days, several Republican lawmakers have faced crowds of constituents at town hall meetings around the country who are angry that they may be in danger of losing their health coverage.

As Republicans look at ways to replace or repair the Affordable Care Act, many suggest that shrinking the list of services that insurers are required to offer in individual and small group plans would reduce costs and increase flexibility.

Healthcare Costs / Flickr

A new report from a group representing 15 health insurers operating in Ohio says managed care is saving Medicaid a lot of money.

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