Medicaid

Affordable Care Act in 2018

Nov 21, 2018
health care
Pexals

Democrats regained control of the House of Representatives in the midterms earlier this month. Their campaign messages focused heavily on healthcare for Americans.

Now that they’re in power, Republicans chances to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act are squashed.

Along with federal protection, Idaho, Nebraska, and Utah, voted to expand Medicaid in the most recent election.

Today on All Sides, where healthcare stands in American and what to expect in 2019.

Jr de Barbosa / Wikimedia Commons

A federal grand jury has indicted a Central Ohio doctor on charges related to a multi-million dollar health care fraud scheme that included prescription creams, a Suboxone clinic and Medicaid customers.

Pixelbay

Ohio’s Medicaid Department says a report by the federal inspector general that says the agency paid for medical care for dead people is wrong.

Erik Drost / Flickr

Ohio officials have added 11 more counties for exemptions from work requirements under the food assistance program known as SNAP.

Charles Barilleaux / Flickr

While Ohio will allow some counties out of work requirements for food assistance, the state's policy means that most African-Americans recipients will not be exempt.

Jr de Barbosa / Wikimedia Commons

The Ohio Department of Medicaid announced that Medicaid will begin covering more medications to help with drug withdrawal symptoms, beginning in January.

Jacqueline Abney is recovering from sustance abuse at Beacon House in Wooster.
Ohio Public Radio

Jacqueline Abney lives in the Beacon House, a residential treatment center that looks just like any other home you would see in the historic downtown area of Wooster. The only difference: Jacqueline is living with several other women struggling with substance abuse disorder.

Gov. John Kasich talks about the latest official fatal overdose numbers from the Ohio Department of Health at a Statehouse press conference.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Gov. John Kasich says his Medicaid department has made some changes to required background checks on behavioral and mental health providers – a requirement that came from an executive order he signed in July. The change is good news to hundreds of providers who feared for their jobs.

Updated at 11:13 p.m. ET

Immigrants who benefit from various forms of public assistance, including food stamps and housing subsidies, would face sharp new hurdles to obtaining a green card under a proposed rule announced by the Trump administration on Saturday.

opioids and prescription medicine bottle
Flickr

Ohio Medicaid says it will continue to enforce a new rule requiring background checks of Medicaid providers. Some of them say the new practice will cost some good providers their jobs and will worsen tight staffing situations.

Hundreds of mental health and addiction counselors could lose their jobs because the state is now requiring criminal background checks for people who provide Medicaid services.

The director of Ohio's Medicaid Department, Barbara Sears, stopped in Cincinnati Tuesday to talk about a recently released study on the benefits of Medicaid expansion in the state.

Four years after going out on a limb to get Medicaid expansion enacted in Ohio, outgoing Republican Gov. John Kasich is worried about the future of the program. So he is now defending it — through a study and through the stories of people who have benefited from the coverage expansion.

pills
Pixabay

The state auditor is urging lawmakers to tell Ohio Medicaid to halt its plan to change its contracts with two pharmacy benefits managers over the way those prescription drug middlemen price their services.

Healthcare Costs / Flickr

In this week's Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU Public Media, Steve Brown and Ann Fisher discuss the large profits made by middlemen through managing pharmacy benefits for the state's Medicaid program.

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