Medicaid

pride flag
Karen Desuyo / Flickr

A national survey finds LGBTQ Midwesterners and their families are more likely to receive public assistance than non-LGBTQ people.

Pixabay

A U.S. District Court judge has thrown out Medicaid work requirements in two states, saying they are “arbitrary and capricious.”  Ohio is now reviewing its plan to impose work requirements on recipients of Medicaid expansion, which was just approved by the federal government two weeks ago.

For a second time in nine months, the same federal judge has struck down the Trump administration's plan to force some Medicaid recipients to work to maintain benefits.

As of last Friday, the state has federal permission to require 20 hours of work per week for many non-disabled people on Medicaid expansion.  The state’s Medicaid director has put a number on how many people might be affected – and how much it might cost to put those requirements in place.

Ohio Senator Matt Huffman wants to raise the Medicaid work requirement from 50 to 65.
Ohio Senate

The federal government says Ohio can require non-disabled Medicaid expansion recipients to work 20 hours a week unless they’re caregiving, in job training or college or over 50-years-old. One state lawmaker is disappointed, because he wanted that age limit to be higher.

Maureen Corcoran is sworn in as Ohio Medicaid director by Gov. Mike DeWine in January.
Ohio Medicaid / Twitter

Ohio's new Medicaid director is taking the helm as the department faces multiple questions about its future.

doctor
Pixabay

The group that represents Ohio’s Medicaid health plans says their managed care process has saved the state about $2.2 billion a year over the last two years. Critics say there are several improvements that can still be made.

State Sen. Matt Huffman (R-Lima)
Ohio Senate

Ohio is among 15 states that have asked the federal government for permission to impose work requirements on Medicaid recipients. Ohio’s request would cover people up to age 50, but a state senator has proposed a bill that would go further.

Ohio lawmakers are scheduled to come back to the Statehouse on Thursday to possibly override some of Gov. John Kasich’s vetoes over the two-year session. But legislative leaders say they might steer clear of Medicaid expansion, a decision that could spare health insurance for 400,000 Ohioans.

The Ohio Senate and House have approved a bill, HB119, that will ramp up scrutiny of people on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), commonly known as food stamps. The new review process will require government administrators to review a person’s eligibility every quarter, this is currently an annual process.

Updated at 2:42 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court has declined to hear a case brought by Republican-led states that were seeking to defund Medicaid funding for Planned Parenthood and other organizations that provide women's reproductive health services.

State of Ohio / Governor's office

The Ohio House and Senate are rolling along with bills they want to pass before the Session ends. But they’re also considering overriding some of Gov. John Kasich’s vetoes, including his rejection of their proposed enrollment freeze for Medicaid expansion. 

Affordable Care Act in 2018

Nov 21, 2018
health care
Pexals

Democrats regained control of the House of Representatives in the midterms earlier this month. Their campaign messages focused heavily on healthcare for Americans.

Now that they’re in power, Republicans chances to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act are squashed.

Along with federal protection, Idaho, Nebraska, and Utah, voted to expand Medicaid in the most recent election.

Today on All Sides, where healthcare stands in American and what to expect in 2019.

Jr de Barbosa / Wikimedia Commons

A federal grand jury has indicted a Central Ohio doctor on charges related to a multi-million dollar health care fraud scheme that included prescription creams, a Suboxone clinic and Medicaid customers.

Pixelbay

Ohio’s Medicaid Department says a report by the federal inspector general that says the agency paid for medical care for dead people is wrong.

Pages