Medicaid Expansion

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Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press

A state auditor's report looking at the impact of the opioid crisis on state Medicaid spending shows the number of Ohio Medicaid recipients with an opioid-related diagnosis quadrupling from 2010 to 2016.

Republican candidate for governor Mike DeWine gestures during a speech in Columbus unveiling proposals on children's issues.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

The Republican candidate for governor has released what he says is a plan to invest in Ohio’s kids, families and future. But Democrats are saying his record says otherwise.

Indianapolis health researchers hope the results of a new study will encourage policymakers to support nationwide Medicaid expansion.

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Rich Cordray brought his campaign to Cincinnati and Springfield Monday. In Hamilton County, he met with healthcare professionals and largely focused on reducing infant mortality.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich
Charles Krupa / Associated Press

Gov. John Kasich had a message for both his fellow Republican and the Democrat who were winners in yesterday’s primary for governor.

Ohio Governor John Kasich speaks during the Ohio State of the State address in the Fritsche Theater at Otterbein University in Westerville, Tuesday, March 6, 2018.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

Gov. John Kasich signed the new two-year $2.6 billion capital budget Friday at the site of a planned mental and behavioral health hospital in Columbus. It’s one of the investments included in that spending plan. But Kasich issued a warning of sorts too.

John Minchillo / Associated Press

Ohio Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor continues to call for a debate with Attorney General Mike DeWine – saying her opponent in the Republican primary for governor has been unclear and even flip flopped on Medicaid expansion. But it appears Taylor also has made a major change on that issue.

Ohio Republican Candidates for governor Mary Taylor (left) and Mike DeWine.
AP Photos

Medicaid expansion is one of Republican Gov. John Kasich’s signature accomplishments, but it’s unlikely to remain if either his lieutenant governor or the attorney general is elected to replace him. That would create a crisis for some 700,000 Ohioans in Medicaid expansion, most of whom are chronically ill or drug addicted.

Dan Konik / Statehouse News Bureau

The budget Ohio's Legislature passed last year requires the state to apply for permission to impose work requirements on able-bodied Medicaid recipients. That could mean thousands of Ohioans could lose their health-care coverage.

Updated at 11:29 a.m. ET

The Trump administration is encouraging states to require "able-bodied" Medicaid recipients to work or volunteer in order to keep their health insurance coverage.

On Thursday, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, which is part of the Department of Health and Human Services, issued new guidelines for states that want some adults to work in exchange for the health insurance coverage.

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