Medicaid Expansion | WOSU Radio

Medicaid Expansion

doctor
Pixabay

The House budget made no big moves on Medicaid or Medicaid expansion – which is a departure from the last budget, as lawmakers created restrictions and former Gov. John Kasich vetoed many of them.

pride flag
Karen Desuyo / Flickr

A national survey finds LGBTQ Midwesterners and their families are more likely to receive public assistance than non-LGBTQ people.

Pixabay

A U.S. District Court judge has thrown out Medicaid work requirements in two states, saying they are “arbitrary and capricious.”  Ohio is now reviewing its plan to impose work requirements on recipients of Medicaid expansion, which was just approved by the federal government two weeks ago.

For a second time in nine months, the same federal judge has struck down the Trump administration's plan to force some Medicaid recipients to work to maintain benefits.

As of last Friday, the state has federal permission to require 20 hours of work per week for many non-disabled people on Medicaid expansion.  The state’s Medicaid director has put a number on how many people might be affected – and how much it might cost to put those requirements in place.

The federal government says Ohio can join the eight other states that have been given permission to impose work requirements on people in Medicaid expansion.

Gov. Mike DeWine, center, speaks between Ohio Senate President Larry Obhof, left, and Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder during the Ohio State of the State address at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, Ohio, Tuesday, March 5, 2019.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

Gov. Mike DeWine is proposing a budget that he says invests in kids and includes no new taxes or tax cuts. The plan, released Friday, calls for spending $69 billion in state revenue over two years.

Maureen Corcoran is sworn in as Ohio Medicaid director by Gov. Mike DeWine in January.
Ohio Medicaid / Twitter

Ohio's new Medicaid director is taking the helm as the department faces multiple questions about its future.

State Sen. Matt Huffman (R-Lima)
Ohio Senate

Ohio is among 15 states that have asked the federal government for permission to impose work requirements on Medicaid recipients. Ohio’s request would cover people up to age 50, but a state senator has proposed a bill that would go further.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich sits for an interview with The Associated Press at the Ohio Governor's Residence and Heritage Garden, Thursday, Dec. 13, 2018, in Columbus.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

It was classic John Kasich.

At a wide-ranging final meeting with top advisers, the outspoken governor of Ohio reveled in big accomplishments, lamented defeats, recounted challenges, ribbed staff, castigated fellow Republicans and ordered at least one more program begun: "You got 24 hours. Do it."

Ohio Gov. John Kasich
Charles Krupa / Associated Press

Over the years, Kasich's tone has changed dramatically, as he’s worked to accomplish his goals and create a national persona as a Trump critic and a promoter of bipartisan compromise.

Ohio lawmakers are scheduled to come back to the Statehouse on Thursday to possibly override some of Gov. John Kasich’s vetoes over the two-year session. But legislative leaders say they might steer clear of Medicaid expansion, a decision that could spare health insurance for 400,000 Ohioans.

State of Ohio / Governor's office

The Ohio House and Senate are rolling along with bills they want to pass before the Session ends. But they’re also considering overriding some of Gov. John Kasich’s vetoes, including his rejection of their proposed enrollment freeze for Medicaid expansion. 

Cade Martin, Dawn Arlotta / Public Domain Pictures

A report from the Georgetown University Center for Children and Families released Thursday shows that the number of children in the U.S. without health insurance rose by almost 300,000 last year. Ohio was one of nine states that saw a significant increase, at 20 percent.

Mike DeWine and Richard Cordray
Associated Press

Doctors in Ohio sparred Monday over which candidate in the state's fall governor's race is best for health care.

Pages