measles

Starr Roden, left, a registered nurse and immunization outreach coordinator with the Knox County Health Department, administers a vaccination to Jonathan Detweiler, 6, at the facility in Mount Vernon, Ohio.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

Child vaccinations in Ohio dropped dramatically in the first full month after the state shut down due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Pediatricians across the U.S. are seeing a steep drop in the number of children coming in for appointments right now — only about 20% to 30% of the volume they would normally see this time of year, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Though telemedicine can make up part of the difference, doctors say the size of the drop-off in some routine well checks is a big problem — for those children and for the nation — though parents are understandably concerned about exposing their kids to the coronavirus.

After decades of progress against one of the most contagious human viruses, the world is seeing measles stage a slow, steady comeback.

The World Health Organization and the CDC say in a new report that there were nearly 10 million cases of measles last year, with outbreaks on every continent.

An estimated 140,000 people died from measles in 2018, WHO says, up from an all-time low of 90,000 in 2016.

And so far 2019 has been even worse.

Wellness Wednesday: Daylight Saving Time

Nov 6, 2019

Americans across the country gained an hour early Sunday, ending the latest cycle of Daylight Saving Time. 

That means sunlight is scarcer.

And just because the clocks read one time doesn’t mean our bodies won’t respond to another. 

Today on Wellness Wednesday on All Sides with Ann Fisher: Daylight Saving Time and sleep. 

  

Guests

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine introduces Dr. Amy Acton as director of Ohio Dept of Health, filling out his cabinet.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

The top doctor in state government says she’s keeping an eye on legislation involving vaccinations and abortion, which opponents say have dubious medical science behind them.

Starr Roden, left, a registered nurse and immunization outreach coordinator with the Knox County Health Department, administers a vaccination to Jonathan Detweiler, 6, at the facility in Mount Vernon, Ohio.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

Franklin County Public Health is offering the Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) vaccine, without appointments, at locations across the county Wednesday-Friday.

Ohio Reports First Measles Case Of 2019

Jul 12, 2019

Amid the country’s worsening measles outbreak, Ohio is reporting the state’s first case of this year.

A young unvaccinated adult in Stark County contracted the virus and has since recovered, but not before coming into contact with some people who are believed to be unvaccinated, according to the Ohio Department of Health’s Jose Rodriguez.

Officials are monitoring those who may have been in contact with this individual and they are in self-quarantine, Rodriguez says.

Updated at 4:33 p.m. ET Friday

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed a bill Thursday ending vaccination exemptions based on religious beliefs, the latest attempt to address the growing measles outbreak, the worst the U.S. has experienced in decades.

The number of new measles cases in the United States so far this year has hit 971, exceeding a record established 25 years ago that covered a whole year of new measles cases, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported on Thursday.

Joel Rosario rides Game Winner to victory in the Breeders' Cup Juvenile horse race at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Ky. on Nov. 2, 2018.
Darron Cummings / Associated Press

It’s a rainy spring evening in Louisville, less than two weeks from one of city’s biggest events: the Kentucky Derby. On May 4, people from across the U.S. and world stream into town to watch a day of horse racing.

Americans could be forgiven for not knowing that much about measles. After all, it's been 51 years since an effective vaccine was introduced, quickly turning the disease from a common childhood experience to a rarity, and nearly two decades since the disease was declared eliminated from the U.S.

But outbreaks have surfaced throughout the country over the past few months, affecting more than 700 people.

Nurse Nicole Simpson prepares a flu shot at the Salvation Army in Atlanta on Feb. 7, 2018.
David Goldman / AP

As the nation battles a measles outbreak, there’s a new bill in the Ohio legislature that would require that parents be told there are exemptions in the law that requires kids to be vaccinated to attend school.

Measles is on the rise again, all around the globe.

Though the number of people affected in the U.S. is still relatively low compared with the countries hardest hit, there are a record number of U.S. measles cases — more than 700, so far, in 2019, according to the CDC — the highest since the disease was eliminated in the U.S. back in 2000.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports 695 measles cases in 22 states.

"This is the greatest number of cases reported in the United States since measles was eliminated from this country in 2000," says a CDC statement issued late Wednesday.

Measles is surging. Last week the U.S. recorded 90 cases, making this year's outbreak the second largest in more than two decades.

So far this year, the U.S. has confirmed 555 measles cases, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Monday. That's 50 percent higher than the total number recorded last year, even though we're only about a quarter of the way through 2019.

And the virus isn't slowing down.

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