Matt Dolan

Students in the classroom
Columbus Neighborhoods / WOSU

As lawmakers consider a deal that would avoid a large increase in the number of public school buildings where students would qualify for private school vouchers, Ohio’s largest school groups are raising concerns about it.

Crystal Brown, left, comforts her 15-year-old daughter Josephine Brown-Walker as she talks about her EdChoice voucher, which allows her to attend a Christian high school in Columbus.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Lawmakers say there's a deal in the works to stop the impending explosion in the number of school buildings where students will be eligible for private school vouchers. But parents and students already in the EdChoice program want it to expand.

Senate Finance Chair Matt Dolan (R-Chagrin Falls) gestures during a discussion about the Ohio Senate version of the budget as President Larry Obhof (R-Medina) looks on.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Gov. Mike DeWine's gun bill is likely to see some changes before it reaches the Ohio Senate for a vote.

Mourners gather for a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Even after a deadly mass shooting in Dayton appeared to flip the gun conversation in Ohio, 2019 comes to a close with legislators having done little on the issue of gun control.

Lawmakers are preparing to hold more hearings on a bill that makes it easier to use lethal force as self-defense in a threatening situation, but Gov. Mike DeWine is calling on the legislature to prioritize another bill before "Stand Your Ground."

Sen. Matt Dolan (R-Chagrin Falls) testifies for S.B. 221, the STRONG Ohio gun violence plan.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Democratic state senators had lots of questions for the sponsor of Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed gun violence bill at its first hearing.

Gov. Mike DeWine unveiled his STRONG Ohio plan in front of law enforcement, mental health professionals and state officials in October.
Daniel Konik / Ohio Public Radio

A quarter of the Ohio House,  all Republicans, have signed on to a new “Stand Your Ground” self-defense bill introduced last week.

guns on display in a gun store
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

A conservative Ohio lawmaker has reintroduced the "Stand Your Ground" self-defense bill. A similar bill was introduced last year, after a veto fight with former Gov. John Kasich resulted in a stripped-down version that eventually passed.

guns on display in a gun store
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

The sponsor of Gov. Mike DeWine’s gun violence proposal said it's a plan that can pass - though it's getting criticism for not including mandatory background checks or a red flag gun seizure law.

The Shamrock Club of Columbus Bass Drum
Columbus Neighborhoods / WOSU

The two year operating budget will move next year’s presidential primary to St. Patrick’s Day. Republicans had to move it to after March 15 so they could award all delegates to a single candidate.

Senate Finance Chair Matt Dolan (R-Chagrin Falls) gestures during a discussion about the Ohio Senate version of the budget as President Larry Obhof (R-Medina) looks on.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

With hours to go before the deadline for a two-year operating budget to be signed, and negotiations stalled with the Ohio House, the Ohio Senate approved a deal that would extend it for 17 days.

Gov. Mike DeWine, center, speaks between Ohio Senate President Larry Obhof, left, and Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder during the Ohio State of the State address at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, Ohio, Tuesday, March 5, 2019.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

Ohio’s two-year state budget is headed to a conference committee this week to work out significant differences between the House and Senate versions. There isn’t much time to deal, because the budget must be signed by Sunday night.

In this file photo, a fixed coal stacker, left, unloads into a massive pile as a dozer works adjacent to the mountain of coal at the Hopedale Mine near Cadiz, Ohio.
Joe Maiorana / AP

An Ohio Senate decision to cut funding Republican Gov. Mike DeWine budgeted for reclaiming abandoned coal mining sites is expected to arise during budget compromise talks this week.

Senate Finance Chair Matt Dolan (R-Chagrin Falls) gestures during a discussion about the Ohio Senate version of the budget as President Larry Obhof (R-Medina) looks on.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

The final version of the Ohio Senate’s budget is expected Wednesday. While there will certainly be some proposals added in, some things are unlikely to change – such as the money going to the local government fund, which has been decimated over the last eight years.

The Ohio Senate’s budget plan adds more money to the fund that helps children who are dealing with severe mental and developmental issues while shifting policy to help parents maintain custody of their children in the process.

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